Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Question, where to find...
[Return to Topics]

KellyGa    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:29:43       [Reply]  [No Email]
those wooden crates you see produce in. I want to use them for nests for the chickens, I have a book that suggests it, and it would be a cheap and easy nest.

I went to the State Farmers Market today, rode around, hoping I would see some in a dumpster, or see some empties I could buy off anybody selling out there. They don't use the dang wooden crates anymore I guess. Everything was in cardboard boxes!!! I was baffled. I thought surely they would be THERE.

Any ideas where to get some? Thanks in advance. Any wooden crates will do, just want them to be nest size.


grma jo    Posted 03-03-2004 at 08:02:39       [Reply]  [Send Email]
the wooden crates are being bought up as fast as possible ..from people like me who use them for crafting booths displays..i went to an auction & ended up paying $5 a wooden box..dove tail ..
why not use some old desk drawers ?? or old plastic refrig bins.. ?? i dont use anything metal in the coop..


Rauville    Posted 03-03-2004 at 04:46:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
The book is right...they make great nests. We use the old wooden orange crates with the center divider in groups of 4 (8 nests). Our Buff Orphingtons actually seem to prefer those over the commerical metal nests (which came from a state college surplus auction for $5.00 per 10 nest unit). Back to the wooden crates; I would suggest putting an wanted advertisment in your local "shopper newspaper". Most anybody over 60 years of age probably have a few in their basement that they have saved, and would be glad to get rid of. If not, next time you're passing through SD, stop by and I'll give you some.
Good Luck....


Clipper    Posted 03-03-2004 at 04:04:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
Why not free-range em in the Saloon?They can use the pockets on the pool tables fer nests.Ain't no werse than that tequilla-addicted hoss that's hanging out there.He's running up the phone bill calling a lot of ladies in Kentucky....gelding indeed.:^)


Juliana    Posted 03-02-2004 at 20:48:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
Kelly, I got one from the feed store, but it's full of walnuts now! Post a pic of you chicken house, I'd like to see it for some ideas.


KellyGa    Posted 03-03-2004 at 09:25:35       [Reply]  [No Email]
I haven't finished it yet, but when I do I will. :)


Dennis    Posted 03-02-2004 at 20:29:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
5 gal plastic buckets also work. Just screw them to a wall, Add straw and wait for the eggs.


Jessie    Posted 03-02-2004 at 19:47:56       [Reply]  [No Email]
You can get crates almost exactly like the milk crates at the Dollar store for 2 bucks.


KellyGa    Posted 03-03-2004 at 09:26:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hey! YOu are right! I forgot about those, thanks!


EngineerJoyce    Posted 03-02-2004 at 19:06:27       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We used empty cattle protein tubs for nests - until jf got industrious and built a set of nests out of scrap lumber.
The tubs work fine, just take up lots of floor space in the coop.


collie    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:43:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
When toolman and I had chickens, we used for nests the plastic cases that the milk is delivered to store in. I not sure if they deliver the milk in the us, the same as here in Canada.


KellyGa    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:48:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hey, maybe the grocery store will spare a few, I will have to ask when the milkman comes in. I just thought it would be a lot easier to find things like that. Thanks. :)


Clipper    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:43:12       [Reply]  [No Email]
If ya find some, get extree ones fer the Saloon....we gots a lotta barstools that vanished somehow Satiddy night....:^)

Clipper: hot on the trail of them thieving cowboys. :^)


KellyGa    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:49:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
lol, so we are reduced to sitting on milk crates????lol


Steve from TN    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:41:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
Couldn't ya build some from some old wooden pallets? Take em apart and nail em back together as boxes.


KellyGa    Posted 03-02-2004 at 18:44:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
I thought about just using the leftover scraps I have around here. Just thought it would save some work. :) Another suggestion for nests was to turn apple crates upside down and use the flats from flowers, vegetable flats and such, put them on top of the crates. Guess I will be making them. Kinda sad to see the old crates not around. I always thought they were good for so many things.


deadcarp    Posted 03-02-2004 at 19:32:42       [Reply]  [No Email]
lotsa packaging ideas have changed with the times - i remember wooden-slat apple baskets and even dovetailed cigar boxes - but more to the issue - why not varnish cardboard to make it more weatherproof? I have a coleman lantern in the original (varnished) cardboard box - must be 40 yrs old. :)


~Lenore    Posted 03-02-2004 at 20:50:01       [Reply]  [No Email]
My grandma had wooden crates setting on a shelf stuffed with straw.
They worked real well.
They were heavy enough, they stayed securely on the shelf in the chicken coop.
They also were very easy to take off the shelf to clean and put new straw.

It is very hard to find wooden boxes these days.
It is also very hard to find glass bottles;
everything is plastic.


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community