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Country Discussion Topics
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3 point tiller question
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John    Posted 02-05-2002 at 15:15:02       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I have a "Long"5.5 ft. 3 point rotary tiller I've used a few times for my gardens.I'm new at using a rotary tiller, My gardens are large. It took about 45 minutes operating the tiller in third gear using my Ford 2000 to finish both gardens this fall. My question is; does the gear or speed affect the tilling quality? Any suggestions on using, operating a rotary tiller?
Thanks


NormanR    Posted 02-07-2002 at 03:03:22       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yes,
Go along as slowly as possible and give the tiller time to work the soil. Try first gear, or creaper type gear, and about half throttle. Don't rush it and skim across the ground, you may break something.



PCC-AL    Posted 02-05-2002 at 17:48:12       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi John,
Burr and Mudcat know what they are talking about. The slower the better. However, I cheat. I first break my garden(about 3 acres total) with an old two blade tiller. It works like a bottom plow. Then I disc and disc and disc. Finally, I use the rotory tiller that belongs to my friend, if I can get it away from him. If not, I have an old Bermuda grass scratcher to smooth everything down. I finally wind up with a nice smooth seed bed. Good luck.


Mudcat49    Posted 02-05-2002 at 15:37:09       [Reply]  [No Email]
I FIND ABOUT 2 MPH WORKS WELL


Burrhead    Posted 02-05-2002 at 15:47:08       [Reply]  [No Email]
Me too.

Ma Burr says she has to chalk mark a tire to see if I'm moving when I til.

I put my PTO shift in high and the tranny in compound low then idle the engine along. It grinds out like powder down about 8-10" deep


Okie-Dokie    Posted 02-06-2002 at 06:55:24       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Burr!!!! A three point tiller is at the top of my wish list. What brand do you recomend? I know that the side shift feature is important and have studied all the liturature from various makes, but really need some input from experianced users. Thanks, Okie


Burrhead    Posted 02-06-2002 at 20:15:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
I don't know anything about the modern ones. I use a fifty some-odd model 5' Dearborn Ford.

From what I've seen at the dealers around here you get what you pay for. If you are gonna use it much I would'nt recommend a International, Modern or Howse brand. They all use Chinese steel and gear boxes.

If you can find a old IHC or Dearborn with a good gearbox you can put new tines on it. They get around $850 to $1250 for a new tiller around here.

PCC is right they do a whole lot better if you turn the garden 1st.

Then after you start using a tiller don't forget to shank or subsoil the garden spot every year or 2 or you will build a hardpan below the tilling that holds water and floods your garden ever time it rains. Then when it don't rain the hardpan won't let water come from below either.


Okie-Dokie    Posted 02-07-2002 at 04:23:36       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks, Burr! I had no idea that International or those other leading brands had gone to Chineese steel! They tend to get more expencive during the gardening season here. I am going to heed your advice and go for the older used one. A neighor has one for sale. It's a 6 footer with side shift. The tines look like they haven't been used a lot. I think I will go get it as soon as it gets light out. Thanks again Burr.


Burrhead    Posted 02-07-2002 at 15:22:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
You're welcome and good luck with it.


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