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If you have ever loved a cat
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sharon    Posted 02-20-2002 at 07:31:54       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Please, if you have ever shared your life with a cat
read this.

Declawing has been outlawed in many European countries,
while we in North America seem to lack information about
this grisly practice.

Declawing is not merely removal of the claw, but a
complete amputation of the first digit including the
knuckle. It causes a great deal of pain and suffering
to the cat. A great deal more pain than from spaying
or neutering.

Declawing is a vicious and terrible mutilation.

Declawing is done under general anesthetic and even
heavily sedated the cat growls, or howls in pain.
During recovery the cat must walk on extremely sore feet
as well as use the litterbox.

There are many horror stories about cats in recovery after
declawing surgery.

As well as pain, and post operative complications,
behavioral problems are often the result of
declawing--not using the litter box, unsociable behavior
towards humans and other cats, becoming a "biter"

Robbed of its primary use of defense the cat is unable to
defend itself, climb or play in the manner that it did before
the surgery. Cats often suffer a lack of confidence as a result.

Pharmaceutical companies often use cat declawing as a means of
testing the effectiveness of anesthetics because is so painful.

There are effective ways of teaching your cat to not
scratch the furniture. By nature cats are intelligent creatures.

And your furniture can be replaced while your cat's toes and sunny
disposition cannot.

Cats are beautiful mystical creatures of nature and love us
unconditionally.

If you love your cat, please, please, please do not declaw.

And please forward this to as many people as you know.
I'm not promising that you will have good luck if you do but
perhaps we can stop the needless pain and suffering of our
feline friends.

For more information about teaching your cat to not ruin the
furniture, as well as declawing information please visit:
http://declaw.lisaviolet.com/

Please educate--don't amputate.


tlak    Posted 02-22-2002 at 04:41:51       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We had a declawed cat once and its tendency was to bite more because he couldnt claw you. Rather be clawed than bitten.


LarryAJ    Posted 02-21-2002 at 11:32:01       [Reply]  [Send Email]
You say, "Robbed of its primary use of defense the cat is unable to defend itself, climb or play in the manner that it did before the surgery. Cats often suffer a lack of confidence as a result." WELL I have NEWS for you!! WE had our first cat declawed when she was spayed because she had taken to clawing the furnature. She "repaid" me by climbing up a tree some 18' TWICE! The second time I was getting ready for church Sunday morning and as I opened the bed room blind, there she was directly across from me (second story BR) in a large Oak tree. I had to get the ladder, luckily I had a 20' section (part of a 40' extension), and climb to the top of it in my suit and get her down. They can go up easily because it is the hind claws that push them up. To come down, they need to hang by the front claws as they work their way down.

And as far as defend themselves, we got a large male that bullied the female. So he got declawed to make things sort of even. Later on we got a large red male my son's wife was allergic to. One day the red cat got "into it" with a small grey cat I had taken in - a stray I could not find the owner for.
The black cat "FLEW" into the red cat like he was defending the smaller grey cat. The red cat get "stomped" in about a second - too fast for me to really see what happened, except to see the red cat go down and then back up out of range of the black cat. It was like the red cat was the styranger in the house and the black cat was not going to allow the grey cat to get beat up. Had NO IDEA cats had some thing like dogs pack behavior - that can be the only explanation for the way the black cat "went to" the aid of the grey cat. The black cat was 20 feet away to start.

Now this same black caught all sorts of things. Twice we pulled up in the drive to the garage and there was the black cat with a LIVE baby bunny in his mouth! I went to get it away from the cat and he let go. Bunny one way cat the other then around and after the bunny. All the while I was trying to get in between them. Finally the bunny (both times) got away and we took the cat in. Two other times I found in the yard the tail of a baby squirrel, one still had the hind legs. I have also come home to find birds (we have a "cat door") and even a chipmonk in the house, alive! I have even heard a commotiom out side, gone to investigate, and found the black cat with a bird he had just caught. I got several away from him safely but one had a broken wing that I had to put out of it's misery. :-( And of course, every so often there was just a fether pile in the yard.

As far as "can't play", a cat with out claws is far easier to "play" with. You can wiggle fingers under the door, etc. and not draw back a bloody (and possibily infected) finger. Did that a lot with the first cat and black cat. NEVER do that with my grey cat and his claws!

All operations are traumatic PERIOD! You cannot avoid that. The body was not made to "like" being cut. I suspect that the pain from a wound - that what surgery reall is! - was an evolutionary "selection" to cause a wounded to hide and lie still to allow the body to heal. Up and running around in a wounded state would have been an added invitation to predators to have a meal. Clearly, there is no long lasting pain from declawing. I would not have done it the second time if I had even the slightest hint that declawing caused permanent pain. And it CERTIANLY did not affect the "personality" of either of my cats.

I'm sorry that you have been "brain washed" (cannot think of another term to use) about declawing. There are MANY animal welfare issues that need fixing. It is too bad that organizations like PETA go off into extreams. That causes them to lose creditablity (like the ACLU) and then they cannot help in areas that SHOULD be addresses. Over population, dumping of unwanted pets, are a few that the rest of the people here would most likely support a rational solution for. In spite of PETA propraganda, most country folks are animal lovers.


breadbakerkathy    Posted 02-25-2002 at 20:27:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
I totally agree with you. I had 4 cats (one died last yr of old age) of which all of them were declawed with no ill effects. The oldest of them, the old male cat, brought 'gifts' home all the time and he was an indoor cat. He just escaped to the outdoors to do his hunting. He brought baby rabbits to the front door too.

Declawing has not affected their personalities. Unless you consider they like to bat with their paws and play a little rough cause we let them. Climbing has been no problem either. They are trained enough to know not to walk on the counters, but when we are not home or they get curious enough, they will get 'up'.

They will scratch the furniture when they want attention such as wanting to be fed. If they had claws, the furniture would be pretty sad looking. There is no noticable wear on the couch.

Sorry to burst your bubble, Sharon, on the tragedy of it all, but it is in the best interest of both the cat and owner to have the indoor cats declawed.


breadbakerkathy    Posted 02-25-2002 at 20:25:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
I totally agree with you. I had 4 cats (one died last yr of old age) of which all of them were declawed with no ill effects. The oldest of them, the old male cat, brought 'gifts' home all the time and he was an indoor cat. He just escaped to the outdoors to do his hunting. He brought baby rabbits to the front door too.

Declawing has not affected their personalities. Unless you consider they like to bat with their paws and play a little rough cause we let them. Climbing has been no problem either. They are trained enough to know not to walk on the counters, but when we are not home or they get curious enough, they will get 'up'.

They will scratch the furniture when they want attention such as wanting to be fed. If they had claws, the furniture would be pretty sad looking. There is no noticable wear on the couch.

Sorry to burst your bubble on the tragedy of it all, but it is in the best interest of both the cat and owner to have the indoor cats declawed.


SA    Posted 02-20-2002 at 16:23:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
Go hug a tree!


Ole Cuss    Posted 02-20-2002 at 14:24:05       [Reply]  [No Email]

I will declaw cats, but only after all other efforts to curb household destructiveness have failed: at that point, the owners are ready to get rid of it and it is the last chance for the cat to remain in its home, so I agree to do it, and even then only the forefeet, never all four. I wholeheartedly agree that the mutilation of animals merely for cosmetic purposes should be outlawed; the cropping of ears and docking of tails simply to suit a human's idea of what they want a breed to look like is a shameful enterprise. And don't get me started on cloning.


Spence - Hate My cats    Posted 02-20-2002 at 10:58:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
I hate my cats. I adopted, (or had dumped on me) two orange tabby males when they were kittens.
First day my sister brought them in I was reading a newspaper. They were all over me purring like crazy. No amount of shooing did any good, they'd be around me doing figure eights around my legs any chance they got.

Had to have em fixed, that cost me. Had to have one tail docked on the biggest cause of a fight with a neighbours cat, now he looks like a lynx. That cost me too. The other got poisoned the other day on the prowl, now he's OK. That cost me.

Never gave them names, call one notail and the other, you guessed it.

The smallest catches mice in the summer, the largest is lazier. Had em 3 years now. All they do
is sleep on the stairway and I have to do a balancing act going up the stairs. Or come in the middle of the night to sleep on my face. If I talk to them they squint there eyes in pity and talk back. They like the most expensive cat food of course. They like to play sneak attack on each other, a throwback from the litter days I guess.
I think they know they're brothers too. If they were'nt fixed they'd be hellbent to do each other in, a territory thing among male cats.

When I carry both of them downstairs they go in that I'm a "sack of sand" posture and they weigh just as much. I have to catch my breath when I get there. It's a good thing they don't like climbing on the kitchen counter or table, or
I'd have to give them away. But all in all ...

I hate my cats.


Spence - Hate My cats    Posted 02-20-2002 at 10:58:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
I hate my cats. I adopted, (or had dumped on me) two orange tabby males when they were kittens.
First day my sister brought them in I was reading a newspaper. They were all over me purring like crazy. No amount of shooing did any good, they'd be around me doing figure eights around my legs any chance they got.

Had to have em fixed, that cost me. Had to have one tail docked on the biggest cause of a fight with a neighbours cat, now he looks like a lynx. That cost me too. The other got poisoned the other day on the prowl, now he's OK. That cost me.

Never gave them names, call one notail and the other, you guessed it.

The smallest catches mice in the summer, the largest is lazier. Had em 3 years now. All they do
is sleep on the stairway and I have to do a balancing act going up the stairs. Or come in the middle of the night to sleep on my face. If I talk to them they squint there eyes in pity and talk back. They like the most expensive cat food of course. They like to play sneak attack on each other, a throwback from the litter days I guess.
I think they know they're brothers too. If they were'nt fixed they'd be hellbent to do each other in, a territory thing among male cats.

When I carry both of them downstairs they go in that I'm a "sack of sand" posture and they weigh just as much. I have to catch my breath when I get there. It's a good thing they don't like climbing on the kitchen counter or table, or
I'd have to give them away. But all in all ...

I hate my cats.


Rod (NH)    Posted 02-20-2002 at 10:43:12       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi Sharon,

Agree. My wife and I have six cats. We would never consider declawing any of them. Those who favor the practice should go without a few fingers for a while. And I am not a tree hugger nor a PETA member either :o).


Old Warrior    Posted 02-20-2002 at 08:09:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
I'm sure you mean well Sharon - and vivid pictures are a wonderful reminder of the things we humans support without regret. Ever eat chicken? Ever feed you cat fish? Order a burger? Get an appendectomy? The interet has pictures of all the instuments and procedures we use to draw blood.

The point is - we ourselves are critters, albeit currently successful ones. If we stopped every gory practice in our arsenal, we'd all walk to work, wear our teeth out munching grain & the terrorists would collect the taxes. Should we advocate all the things that have been shown to cause a violent reaction? declaring war? chopping heads? bombing mountains? executions? abortions? chopping bananas or cutting lawns or pulling carrots? No, but if it works we might as well get used to it.


Sir, you have my compliments.    Posted 02-20-2002 at 08:51:06       [Reply]  [No Email]
I am pleased to see that there are still a few people in this world that think for themselves. I am somewhat afraid that after we are gone, the ones that follow will just be led like sheep. While many like Sharon may have good intentions, action without consideration of consequences is not a desirable goal. Have a good day Old Warrior.


bob    Posted 02-20-2002 at 13:52:11       [Reply]  [No Email]
Old warrior I,m proudto have read your answer you not only spoke truth but for a change their was a common sense in answer thands bob


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