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Country Discussion Topics
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Pipe sizes
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deadcarp    Posted 06-04-2004 at 01:14:57       [Reply]  [No Email]
Is there a chart somewhere for standard pipe sizes? (are galvanized and well pipe the same thing?)I know i would probably be inside diameter and wall thickness but that's okay. This time i'm looking for something hollow with 1 3/8-inch outside diameter. :)


JOE    Posted 06-05-2004 at 20:25:51       [Reply]  [No Email]
YOUR TALKING ABOUT 1 INCH PIPE IT HAS AN OUTSIDE DIAMETER OF APPROX 1 3/8 INCH. GALVANIZED PIPE IS STANDARD MILD STEEL PIPE WITH AN ANTI-COROSIVE PLATING SPRAYED ONTO IT TO PREVENT RUSTING LIKE IN WELLS. BUT THEY USE PVC OR POLY PIPING IN WELLS A LOT ALSO


US Plumber General    Posted 06-04-2004 at 03:42:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
Government Pipe Specifications
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All pipe is to be made of a long hole, surrounded by metal or plastic centered around the hole.

All pipe is to be hollow throughout the entire length - do not use holes of different length than the pipe.

The I.D. (inside diameter) of all pipe must not exceed the O.D. (outside diameter) - otherwise the hole will be on the outside. (This is bad.)

All pipe is to be supplied with nothing in the hole so that water, steam or other stuff can be put inside at a later date.

All pipe should be supplied without rust - this can be more readily applied at the job site. N.B. Some Vendors are now able to supply pre-rusted pipe. If available in your area, this product is recommended as it will save a lot of time on the job site.

All pipe over 500 ft (153m) in length should have the words "long pipe" clearly painted on each end, so the Contractor will know it is a long pipe.

Pipe over 2 miles (3.2 km) in length must have the words "very long pipe" painted in the middle, so the Contractor will not have to walk the entire length of the pipe to determine whether or not it is a long pipe or a very long pipe.

All pipe over 6" (152 mm) in diameter must have the words "large pipe" painted on it, so the Contractor will not mistake it for small pipe.

Flanges must be used on all pipe. Flanges must have holes for bolts quite separate from the big hole in the middle.

When ordering 90 degrees, 45 degrees or 30 degrees elbow, be sure to specify right hand or left hand; otherwise you will end up going the wrong way. (This, too, is bad.)

Be sure to specify to your vendor whether you want level, uphill or downhill pipe. If you use downhill pipe for going uphill, the water will flow the wrong way. (This is very bad.)

All couplings should have either right hand or left hand thread, but do not mix the threads - otherwise, as the coupling is being screwed on one pipe, it is unscrewed from the other.




Rowdy Yates    Posted 06-04-2004 at 02:38:48       [Reply]  [No Email]
You have "Iron pipe size" (IPS), in which the outside diameter is the same on all IPS pipes, black flexible plastic(well pipe), galvinized, PVC, etc. Then you have "Copper Tube Size" (CTS), you will also find this in flexible plastic, and pvc pipes. Most generally CTS pipe such as copper is 1/8" larger on the outside than on the inside. Example: 1/2"copper measures 5/8"on the outside, 1" copper measures 1 1/8" O.D. All CTS pipe will have the same outside diameter, but the inside diameter (ID) will vary depending on the wall thickness. All IPS pipe will also measure the same on the outside, regardless of the material it is made from, whether it be plastic or steel. 100# 1" IPS black plastic pipe will have a diffent ID than 200# 1", but the outside (OD) measures the same. There are even more variables depending on the "schedule" of the pipe. "Schedule 80" has a thicker wall than "Schedule 40". "Schedule 40" is the norm for most all your steel and pvc pipes, same OD but diffent ID.

Are ya confused now?


Rowdy Yates    Posted 06-04-2004 at 02:52:55       [Reply]  [No Email]
Now that I have ya good and confused......

It depends on what you're calling "well pipe". I don't have a piece of 1" steel pipe in front of me, but I would assume/guess that 1" galvinized or black steel pipe would measure real close to 1 3/8" OD. Keep in mind that galvinized will be ever so slightly larger than plain black steel pipe because of the galvinizing. Regardless, all plumbing pipe goes by IPS (Iron Pipe) and CTS (Copper Pipe).....all in which have the same OD, and different ID, depending on the material it is made of and the application.


here's a...    Posted 06-04-2004 at 01:34:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
standard pipe size chart..


deadcarp-thanks    Posted 06-04-2004 at 07:32:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
Thanks for your help lads. See i have a wheelbarrow wheel with the (Too small anyway) 5/8 bearings popped out, and i wanna build a paddle wheel on it. It's about like i expected - in order to use pipe i'll have to take a piece of 1-inch ID and use hangar iron for a shim to 1 3/8. Okay at least then i can slip another layer and go to 1" solid rod for the axle. Should make finding bearings simpler.


Have you    Posted 06-04-2004 at 08:14:42       [Reply]  [No Email]
considered oilite bronze bushings instead(like on lawn tractor front wheels)They are available in about any ID/OD combo from 3/8 ID up.Prolly outlast bearings in a low load/low rpm wet environment like a paddlewheel.


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