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Country Discussion Topics
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Question -- inverter 220 volt
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mud    Posted 06-17-2004 at 06:08:04       [Reply]  [No Email]

is it possible to convert the 110 volt power coming out of an inverter to 220 volt to run a submerable well pump?


Willy-N    Posted 06-17-2004 at 09:25:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
Maybe with a Large (120 to 240) Step up Transformer. The loads on the inverter would be doubled and you would need a large one depending on the size of the pump. Motor loads take a big surge to get them going sometimes 3 times the running amps. So make sure you check the surge rating of the Inverter. 10 amps at 240 volts is like 20 amps at 120 volts when it is steped up. So if you are stepping up 12 volts DC to 240 volts AC you will need 20 amps @ 12 volts to make 1 amp at 240 volts. So if you need 10 amps for the pump you will need 200 amps from the 12 volt sourse feeding the Inverter. This is not figuring in conversion losses that will also make the draw larger on the 12 volts DC. So starting a 10 amp 240 volt motor could draw for a short time 600 amps at 12 volts DC going into the Inverter or Converter depending on what you want to call it. Mark H.


Clod    Posted 06-17-2004 at 10:28:37       [Reply]  [No Email]
When you need a transformer to double AC voltage.(Transformers only work with AC) You raise voltage but loose amps,Not only that but the wires inside the transformer have to have large copper wires for current capabilty.Which means high cost. The best thing is find another method.Like a AC power plant. (But often my guesses are wrong)


Willy-N    Posted 06-17-2004 at 19:41:20       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yes in a sence they do. They also have a little loss of electricty in them too. What you have to do is match the Transformer to the KVA load needed for the job. It would take a expensive transformer to do it. By the time you added up all the stuff to do this job a Generator would be cheaper. Mark H.


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