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Country Discussion Topics
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Mules
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Arch-KY    Posted 08-12-2004 at 08:01:53       [Reply]  [Send Email]
To produce Mules. Does anyone know why it is more common to use a horse mare and a donkey jack than a jennet and a stallion?


screaminghollow    Posted 08-12-2004 at 08:32:01       [Reply]  [No Email]
You use a mare and jack to get the qualities of a mule. If you use a jennet and a stallion, you get a hinney. Hinney's are more horse like in appearance, usually smaller in size. They generally have lousy confirmation and arn't much good for anything 'cept maybe riding. There's alot of huge draft mules (even 17 hands) on the Amish farms round here. They work all day, where draft horses often aren't good for more than six hours. The smaller size of a hinney doesn't allow for much work. I've occassionally see ads for hinney's for sale. I believe there is one in the Lancaster Farmer this past week. As I recall it was only 11 or 12 hands.
I don't know about the "attitude" of a hinney, but farmers around here say a mule never forgets anything. If you mistreat it once, it will eventually get you, even if it takes years. I heard stories of mistreated mules sold to others and 15 yrs later the "abuser" walks by at the feed mill etc, and the mule kicks them. I also heard they never forget a person who is kind to them.
I had a mule for a year, I sold it to a woman, who in turn sold him to a riding school and about five years later ended up at a farm where my friend keeps his horse. I went along to see his horse, and when I got out of the truck, a mule whinnied at me and came running to the barn where I was. It was "Taz" He nuzzled me and sniffed my pocket where I carried treats when I had him. (When I left, it was as if he didn't understand why I wasn't taking him along. He ran back and forth along the fence and made quite a rucus. I did try to buy him back, but the new owner wouldn't part with him.)


Dee in mid MO    Posted 08-12-2004 at 11:32:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
screaminghollow: good story about your mule remembering you, tugged at my heart strings tho'.

Arch - This is from ruralheritage.com:
Mule or Hinny? by Betsy Hutchins

"At first glance a hinny seems to be a mule, but on closer inspection the hinny is more subtly like a horse. The hinny's head and face are often more horselike; the ears are usually shorter and sometimes rounder than a mule's ears.

The hinny usually has a fuller tail and more horselike limbs and feet than the mule, and its body is more like that of a horse. In temperament, the young hinny favors the donkey, tending to be gentler and less nervous than the young mule. Hinnies are more likely to neigh like a horse than to bray. But, as with all equines, their voices are distinctive to the individual animal.

Neither the mule nor the hinny is simply half horse and half donkey, but is an individual animal with completely blended characteristics, plus a few new ones belonging only to itself and not found in either parent.

Neither the mule nor the hinny is simply half horse and half donkey, but is an individual animal with completely blended characteristics, plus a few new ones belonging only to itself and not found in either parent."
- for more info, contact the American Donkey and Mule Society, PO Box 1210, Lewisville TX 75067.

As well, go to this VetCentric site:
http://www.vetcentric.com/magazine/magazineArticle.cfm?ARTICLEID=1298



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