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Country Discussion Topics
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Raising Pigs on Raised Platforms
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Karen    Posted 04-16-2002 at 18:01:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We saw an article about raising a pair of pigs on a raised platform (kind of like a deck). The boards are spaced so that the pigs feet do not get caught in the decking but it is wide enough that the pig doo-doo just falls through and you can just go out and hose the whole thing off. You can then just rake it out and transport it to the compost bin. They claim very little odor with this method and healthier pigs. You can also just disenfect the deck after the piggies are gone to the freezer and you don't have to worry about rotating to another site the following years. Big investment the first year, but will last for many many years.
We are considering using this method but modifing it to allow for a ramp going down into a whallow so they can cool off during the hot summer months.

Has anyone had any experience with this type of confinement? Also, can you tell me how many square feet each pig needs? Thanks a million!



Duey (IA)    Posted 04-16-2002 at 18:24:47       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Karen,
When I was a kid I helped a friend build several of these. Made em out of oak 2X4s, spiked on bridge planks that were on edge. Had a small area in one corner with walls and roof to provide shelter. In the spring and fall he pulled the whole thing forward and then loaded and spread the manure on the crop fields. I learned to dip the nails in oil to drive them through that oak. A nail that had been bent over then pulled out, could be pounded straight and driven through that hard oak, IF you dipped it in oil. It only cost me $20 bucks on a bet to learn that, LOL. Duey


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