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Country Discussion Topics
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Wine
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Ohio-Bob    Posted 09-09-2004 at 04:28:03       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Does anyone have a recipe for onion wine,i would like to try and make some,


bill b va    Posted 09-09-2004 at 06:39:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
HERE YOU GO
Requested Recip
e:ONION WINE"Have you ever heard of Vidalia wine?" Stephanie, G
ainesville, Georgi
aONIONSVidalia wine is made from the sweet Vidalia onion, but a
ny sweet onion will do.
Do not use pungent white or yellow onions. Use red onions only if they
are sweet. Prope
rly made and aged, this can be an exceptional wine.ONION WINE
(1) 1 lb sweet Vidali

Requested Recipe:
ONION WINE
"Have you ever heard of Vidalia wine?" Stephanie, Gainesville, Georgia
ONIONS
Vidalia wine is made from the sweet Vidalia onion, but any sweet onion will do. Do not use pungent white or yellow onions. Use red onions only if they are sweet. Properly made and aged, this can be an exceptional wine.
ONION WINE (1)

1 lb sweet Vidalia onions
lb potato
1 lb golden raisins
2 lemons (zest and juice)
2 lbs fine granulated sugar
7 pts water
1 crushed Campden tablet
tsp pectic enzyme
1 tsp yeast nutrient
1 pkt Champagne wine yeast
Chop or mince raisins and soak overnight in pint of warm water. Thinly slice onions and potato into remaining water. Put on heat and bring to a simmer, holding simmer for 45 minutes. Grate zest from lemons and combine zest with raisins. Transfer raisins and zest into nylon straining bag in primary. Add sugar to primary. Strain onions and potato, pouring hot water over sugar and discarding pulp. Add juice from lemons and yeast nutrient, then stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Cover with clean cloth and set aside to cool. When at room temperature, add crushed Campden tablet and stir. Recover primary and set aside for 12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, stir, recover primary, and set aside another 12 hours. Add activated yeast. Stir daily for 14 days. Drip drain nylon straining bag (do not squeeze) over primary, recover and allow to settle overnight. Rack liquid into secondary, top up if required and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days until wine clears and no new sediments form during a 30-day period. Stabilize, sweeten to taste, wait 10 days, and rack into bottles. Allow to age 6 months before tasting. [Author's own recipe]
ONION WINE (2)

1 lb sweet Vidalia onions
lb carrots
11-oz can 100% Welch's White Grape Juice frozen concentrate
1 lb fine granulated sugar
7 pts water
3 tsp citric acid or acid blend
1 crushed Campden tablet
tsp pectic enzyme
1 tsp yeast nutrient
1 pkt Champagne wine yeast
Thinly slice onions and carrots water. Put on heat and bring to a simmer, holding simmer for 45 minutes. Put sugar, citric acid, concentrate, and yeast nutrient in primary. Strain simmering water into primary, discarding onions and carrots. Stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Cover with clean cloth and set aside to cool. When at room temperature, add crushed Campden tablet and stir. Recover primary and set aside for 12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, stir, recover primary, and set aside another 12 hours. Add activated yeast. Stir daily for 10-14 days. Rack liquid into secondary, top up if required and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days until wine clears and no new sediments form during a 30-day period. Stabilize, sweeten to taste, wait 10 days, and rack into bottles. Allow to age 6 months before tasting. [Author's own recipe]
My thanks to Stephanie of Gainesville, Georgia for requesting this recipe.
This page was updated on July 28th, 2000


TimV    Posted 09-09-2004 at 06:34:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
Bob: I don't have one handy, though I had one around at some point. One thing I DO remember is that you want to use the sweetest onions you can find. Vidalias (sp??) are the usual choice. "Hot" onions will make it undrinkable.


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