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Country Discussion Topics
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My woodstove
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Paula    Posted 10-18-2004 at 13:52:15       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Well I fired up my woodstove for the first time (after seasoning
some weeks ago) this weekend. It was about 45degrees outside
so it was as good a weekend as any to get my homework in.

Experiment:
How long would the stove burn and how often must it be fed.

Materials:
Woodstove - dutchwest small, indoor outdoor thermometer with
max and min readout, seasoned hardwood firewood, kindling
wood, newspaper, strips of cardboard.

Method:
Woodstove fed kindling and built up to one log at 11am. Temp
noted. Damper closed after about 20minutes burn, primary are
opened and catalytic converter opened about 1 turn.

No action till 7pm (about an 8hr burn). Temp noted, fire fed one
log and kindling as before.


Results:
The house, about 1008sqft, was about 77degrees when the
damper was closed. The log burned (visible flame) about 3hrs
and then was glowing coals for 5hrs (till refed at 7pm). Even
after the loss of flame, and even at 7pm when the stove was fed,
the temp stayed about 70degrees in the house - 74 degrees
when the stove was fed again at 7pm.

The stove was allowed to go overnight till about 7pm the
following morning. The temp was about 73 degrees. There was
still a live coal and a flame was coaxed with paper and blow/
poker ( a large poker that is hollow so you can blow directly on
the embers).

Note: the baseboard was used as back up and the thermostats
were set to 60degrees. It can be argued that the baseboards
maintained the house temp, but baseboard alone, set at higher
temperatures will only take the house up to 70degrees if that
high.

Discussion:

This vermont castings dutchwest is pretty good. Further testing
when it is colder outside.

Paula


KatG    Posted 10-18-2004 at 16:42:22       [Reply]  [Send Email]
we ended up taking our fancy Englander wood heater back where we bought it...Seems the gasket around the door wasn't sealing correctly...so had to take it out and bak 35 miles and wait 7 days to get our money back...Went and bought a smaller USSTOVES hearter that has no blower or catalyic burner..Lot cheaper but wasn't near as heavy to unload and easier to install...had a fire the other night and seemed to do real good...MAtt did not build a big fire...Instructions said to season the heater slowly...so...who knows...When we first got married we just had a regular old wood heater that someone gave us...ran the pipe out a window on a door...put it up on concrete blocks and had a heat board under that...Wonder we didn't burn up but we stayed warm through some harsh Arkansas winters...I like our new heater because you can see the fire burning...romantic..lol...KAtG


mud    Posted 10-18-2004 at 14:00:39       [Reply]  [No Email]
never thought to test one. shoot, i have been known to build such a fire that the mrs. opens the windows and shooes me out the door.

make sure not to dry out your house too much. need a little humidity so your nose is still easy to pick.

mud


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