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Country Discussion Topics
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Re designed Boom picture Heavy duty one!
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Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 13:55:28       [Reply]  [No Email]

Decided to redesign the boom to a Heavy Duty one after I built the other one. Might be just because I like tinkering also! This one has a 5 to 1 saftey ratio for lifting and its working load is 1,000+ lbs. Next one is going to be a light duty one. Mark H.


puldeau    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:03:20       [Reply]  [Send Email]
willy, if i may ask, are ya forks solid? i made a set for my front end loader from 4inch channel iron,cut from zero to widest edge length wise, put two pieces together and welded. makes good forks and are very strong, but really like the way you have things set up to be able to use the back of your tractor. also like the way you can bolt or unbolt ever thing, if it is ok with you, would like to use some of ya ideas for my self. thanks, robert


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:12:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
No problem if you see a idea you can use, use it that is what these sites are for. I got some good ideas off the sites to modifie it myself. Not solid forks but I enclosed the bottom of the 3" chanel with 2 1/2" X 1/4" thick Strap Iron to help keep the webs from bending. I lifted my 18 ft double axle flat bed trailer off the ground in the middle of the forks and they held with out bending. Not sure what would bend them and did not want to see. I have Harden Steel regular Forks on a lift for my big bales of hay. Mark H.


dang    Posted 11-24-2004 at 15:47:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
wouldn't load all the way up for me, not your fault. Will try again later
REt


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:04:22       [Reply]  [No Email]
When that happens to me I just hit refresh and then things load. Mark H.


Fawteen    Posted 11-24-2004 at 14:25:15       [Reply]  [No Email]
Mark, a question if I may...

What's the point of that hitch ball way up by the top link like that?


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 15:32:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
That is to move around a Goose Neck Trailer when the Boom and Forks are not on it. The Goose Necks need the ball way up like in the back of a Pickup Bed. Mark H.


Fawteen    Posted 11-24-2004 at 15:56:04       [Reply]  [No Email]
Ah. Thanks.



Fawteen - 'Nother questio    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:04:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
I've always been told (and my experience confirms) that hitching high like that is unsafe, and contributes to the likelyhood of a rearward upset.

You've obviously put a lot of thought into the design (I've been lurking...) so I'm assuming I'm missing something on this point. Care to fill me in?


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:22:37       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yes lifting anything to heavy can bring the front end up. Lifting high can also lift the front tires even higher. You need to know what your tractor can support befor doing it. 99% of the time they use these balls on a tractor just to move around and park a empty Goose Neck trailer not one full of weight. I can lift around 2,000 lbs at that point and not sure any Goose Neck Trailers weigh that much on the hitch empty. If over loaded the hitch and trailer will hit the ground befor the tractor tips over and if you left the forks on it would even help more. The Trailer Socket locks to the Ball also so I find it hard to see how it would flip. Mark H.


Fawteen    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:25:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Seems logical. I doubt the "tongue weight" (if that term applies to a gooseneck) would be much over 500-1000 pounds anyway. Just curious.

Nice job on that rig, BTW, hope ya sell a passel of 'em.


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:42:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
Non Comercial 5th wheels hitched I have seen run 3,500 to 7600 lb tongue load ratings for loaded trailers. Course hooked onto a lighter tractor might cause you some big problems and you need to know your ratings on your lift arms!! I sure would never try to move a loaded goose neck but have moved many loaded regular trailers with the lower hitch with no problems at all. Mark H.


Burrhead    Posted 11-24-2004 at 15:49:22       [Reply]  [No Email]
sheeze I figgered even a yuppie wudduh knowed that.


Greg    Posted 11-24-2004 at 14:20:33       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Mark,
Looks nice and stout. One little suggestion if I may? Take the grinder and round the corners of those angles off a little. You'll thank yourself later.


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 15:36:42       [Reply]  [No Email]
I ran out of Grinder Disks! Had to get it painted. I need to buy a box of them went thru 3 small ones and a 10 inch big one cutting steel up for it. I did knock the sharp edges off everything but would have liked to round the corners for the shins, head and knees. I need to repaint it again and will touch up the corners some more. Mark H.


toolman    Posted 11-24-2004 at 14:12:14       [Reply]  [No Email]
nice job mark , looks well built, but if you keep tinkerin it,s gonna tip most tractors over lol. really nice job though.


Willy-N    Posted 11-24-2004 at 16:06:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Geting more weight on the rear for those winter chains, I need the traction!! It does weigh right around 200 lbs tho. Mark H.


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