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Country Discussion Topics
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It's Not About theTractors
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New-Gen    Posted 11-26-2004 at 16:27:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
August 30, 1960 was a turning point for Deere and company. On that day they were the gracious host to all of their dealers in an event known as Deere Day In Dallas. The theme of this event was the unveiling of a new line of tractors known as the "New Generation of Power". This was a radical change for the company, putting their time honored 2 cylinder tractors out to pasture.
Volumes have been written on this subject, and anything I could say here would be redundant, as all of my knowlege on the subject comes from these volumes.Besides, this story is not about tractors.

The first knowlege I had of this change was when my dad told me about it. I remember him patiently explaining to me that some of the new models had four small cylinders and some had six, instead of two big cylinders so they would no longer have the unique popping sound. He explained the four new models in a simplified manner that I could relate to in my six year old mind as applied to our farm, telling me that "the 1010 is the size of our 9N Ford, the 2010 is the size of our M {Farmall}, the 3010 is the size of our JD 70, and the 4010 is bigger yet" {I don't agree with those size comparisons now but it worked for me at the time}

At about the same time this was taking place, I was going through an important time of my life, the beginning of my formal education.At the time kindergarten was optional so I started right into first grade. One day that fall while we were out in the playground for recess the local IH dealer's implement truck drove by hauling a brand new 560. The principal, who happened to be filling in for the teacher doing playground duty pointed it out and announced that "Some lucky farmer is getting a shiny new tractor!". I quickly came back with the statement that he should have bought a John Deere. The principal replied, "A John Deere!!! Who wants to listen to POPOPOPOP all day??" In what I considered my most authoritative voice {at least as authoritative as a six year old can muster up}, I proceeded to inform him that the new ones wouldn't be making that sound anymore, followed by a repeat of the explanation and size comparisons my Dad had given me a few weeks before. I was deeply insulted when he refused to believe me. The next day when I presented him with one of the pamphlets I found next to my dad's chair in the living room he still didn't act impressed! Knowing what some of that old liturature sells for on E-bay, coupled with the fact that it's pretty safe to assume he tossed it in the wastebasket as soon as I walked out of his office doesn't do much toward helping me put the incident behind me!

In our particular area there were about equal numbers of John Deere, IH, and Oliver, with a sprinkling of Allis Chalmers, plus a few 8N and 9N fords. The bus rides to and from school could put any political debate to shame as farm boys {and sometimes girls} from six to eighteen expounded on the merits of their brand of choice. In fact the bus driver would even chime in from time to time, usually siding with whichever brand was the most sparsely represented at the particular time. I never did figure out what kind of tractors he farmed with, but it doesn't really matter, because, it's not about the tractors.

I was in a particularly uncomfortable position during my early school days as we had about a 50/50 mix of green and red equipment on our farm. To make matters worse, the neighbor to the west was as adamant about green as the one to the east was red. Both families had boys who were in high school when I was in first grade, and they used to get me between them and try to make me choose! The fear of getting beat up kept me neutral until they graduated, then I gravitated toward the green and yellow, which really doesn't matter, because, remember, this story......well, you know.......

In retrospect, it really doesn't matter what kind of tractors we liked then or now, what matters is the fellowship we all shared back then, and even now, as a lot of us still live in the area. Some of us are heavier, some lighter, most taller with various amounts and colors of hair, but when we get together {along with some new faces we've added to the group along the way} we can still have a good tractor color war {or for that matter debate on just about any given subject} when we set our minds to it!

So as you can see................IT'S NOT ABOUT THE TRACTORS!



Farmall    Posted 11-27-2004 at 10:30:33       [Reply]  [Send Email]

I made a vow in 1961 not to drive any tractor newer than 1960, and I never have. Never beeen on a 4 / 6 cyl Deere. I remember our local JD dealer throwing a feed and touting the new line iof tractors. My brother and me for the most part looked at the used stuff. I remember getting a plate each, and 2 locals came by us with there plates. One was off the noodle. Both had been out in the hog lot cause they both had hog stuff all over their overboots. Dang near ended our eating


HaySam    Posted 11-27-2004 at 03:33:12       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I bought the first 4010 JD that came to
Southwest Ark. Traded it for the first 4020.


DD    Posted 11-26-2004 at 22:13:35       [Reply]  [No Email]
Another good story there New-Gen : ) Keep em coming, we always enjoy them.


Chas in Me    Posted 11-26-2004 at 17:00:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yeah, it isn't about the tractors. It's about finding things you have in common and then arguing about the details. You had country life and farming in common with those kids, you just argued about the details.
What a great country.
Chas, wishing he had some warmer weather in commom with someone, up here in Maine.


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