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Country Discussion Topics
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Picture of the Fire Pump
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Willy-N    Posted 12-01-2004 at 08:24:39       [Reply]  [No Email]

This is part of what is inside the building. The Pump feeds 3 folded up hoses hooked up all the time and extras are stacked up. It puts out 125 Gals a miniute at 85 PSI. That way you can run with the hose instead of un-rolling it. This allows me to get to the house and 2 shops fast if needed. It also can fill the truck in about 10 mins or less. EBay sells the 100ft Red Quick Rack & Hose for about $60.00 under Fire Hose if you want one for your place. Mark H.


toolman    Posted 12-01-2004 at 11:01:30       [Reply]  [No Email]
nice setup mark, guess we are gonna have to start watching our waterlines if it gets cold , with no snow, mine should be deep enough but we always have lots of snow for insulation too.


Willy-N    Posted 12-01-2004 at 11:30:56       [Reply]  [No Email]
It got down to 18 this morning and no ground cover yet here either. Glad my well and house pipes are down 5 ft. The pipe to the big barn is only 3 ft and 28 inches at one point a rock was in the way and needs some snow to protect it when it gets around 11 degs for a extended time!! If not I may need to pile dirt over it near the slab going into the barn. Last year I cleared the snove over it and the pipe froze up for a week and watering 18 cows is a pain! Mark H.


toolman    Posted 12-01-2004 at 11:48:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
when the frost gets to a wall or foundation thats where it will go down, pile a few bales of hay or straw on it, cover with tarp to keep the hay dry.


mark/mn    Posted 12-01-2004 at 11:29:44       [Reply]  [No Email]
it's got me a bit nervous too. My lines are down
12' but it's the standpipes to the waterers that
are getting to be cause for concern


toolman    Posted 12-01-2004 at 11:46:30       [Reply]  [No Email]
i have an automatic waterer for the horses , i put a 10inch pipe in and ran the water line up the middle, i can look down and the water table is at the 6 foot level so as long as that stays high i don,t think it would freeze but i have one thats only 5 ft. and i,ll watch that one we use it alot so it should be ok.nice an sunny here today but cool, only 8 hours of daylight though, be glad when they start to get longer after the 21st.


mark/mn    Posted 12-01-2004 at 13:55:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
putting a shroud around mine is one of the
things on my list but it seems to be forgotten
for more pressing chores during the diggable
months.

I've only had trouble when there is no snow,
seems them big babies of mine stomp the
frost down to 5 - 6' when the ground is bare. I'd
think those dinner plate hooves would spread
their weight out but they don't.


Willy-N    Posted 12-01-2004 at 11:33:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
12 feet? Man it must get cold where you live!! Sure hate to have to replace them at that depth. Mark H.


mark/mn    Posted 12-01-2004 at 14:00:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
They were only to be down 8' but the outlaw
eyeballed when he dug the trench. I hope the
lines last until I slide off the mudball, I didn't
like it in the trench the first time.


mark/mn    Posted 12-01-2004 at 13:58:44       [Reply]  [No Email]
They were only to be down 8' but the outlaw
eyeballed when he dug the trench. I hope the
lines last until I slide off the mudball, I didn't
like it in the trench the first time.


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