Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Question for the wayback folks on car heaters
[Return to Topics]

jmoore    Posted 01-02-2005 at 17:46:02       [Reply]  [Send Email]
When did the first auto heaters appear insde of automobiles? And what particular make of auto had them?
Thanks JM


Kathryn Jordan    Posted 04-06-2007 at 10:01:33       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I'm writing a novel set in the 1920s. Character drives a
1923 Stutz Bearcat. Did cars way back then have
manifold heaters?


screaminghollow    Posted 01-03-2005 at 09:13:32       [Reply]  [No Email]
I know this won't help much, but the Amish around here have enclosed carriages with small kerosene heaters in them. Outside of Warrenton, Va, there used to be an antique shop with an old horse drawn Gypsy type wagon, it had a small wood stove inside.
My Dad used to have an early pickup truck with a heater, but I think that was about 1930 vintage. I was just a tyke and don't remember much about it.


Rajah from Delhi    Posted 01-02-2005 at 21:23:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
The do seem to be very common here, as Vindar's 1993 taxi has a factory installed heater and an airconditioner. His coustmers always ride in complete comfort.
Rajah


JoeK    Posted 01-02-2005 at 20:43:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
On some models,even into the 60s,heaters were an option,particularily budget models.I once had a 64 Falcon out of the SW that had no heater whatsoever,just a small blower for defogging windshield.


Vic in Kenefick    Posted 01-02-2005 at 18:54:22       [Reply]  [No Email]
My first car, a 55 Chevy had a 5 gallon bucket to put charcoal in and it sat in the passanger side floor board............bwaaaaa what a ride!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


toolman    Posted 01-02-2005 at 19:00:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
i didn,t know those were for charcoal i thought that was a shine barrle.


Burrhead    Posted 01-02-2005 at 19:23:22       [Reply]  [No Email]
a built in charcoal pit in the summer and a heater in winter, and these kids today think they get accessories.


Redmud    Posted 01-02-2005 at 18:48:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
I had a 27 Dodge Brother that had 2 manifold heaters, You controled the heat with the vent. The heater in the rear floor had an air vent under the car, you could open and close the vent useing your foot. I guess people didn't mind a little dust back then as long they got a little heat with it.


SY    Posted 01-02-2005 at 18:04:08       [Reply]  [No Email]
Auto Lite Manifold heater on Model A Fords. Had a little door in the firewall.


Les    Posted 01-02-2005 at 17:53:27       [Reply]  [No Email]
We had a '39 Ford and it had a Southwind heater.


Willy-N    Posted 01-02-2005 at 20:21:37       [Reply]  [No Email]
Had one in my VW Baja it ran off gasoline with a fan. The exsaust went thru the fender well. Worked great till excess fuel built up and it would back fire real loud in town! Sometimes it would bang 3 or 4 times in a row so I tried to only use it on the country roads!! Mark H.


Good Heater    Posted 01-02-2005 at 19:58:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
35 Plymouth with S/W..... bout as scary as those Charcoal Pots,


MIDWAY    Posted 01-03-2005 at 07:29:53       [Reply]  [No Email]
The store I worked for around 1947 installed gasoline heaters in cars. Used to put them inside on the firewall. I forget who made them,I believe we ran a line from up near the carburator (gravity fed).


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community