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Country Discussion Topics
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6- DAYS and the Cow is NOW STANDING!!!!
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Mark Hendershot    Posted 05-25-2002 at 06:56:27       [Reply]  [No Email]
I haven't said anything about this but Shellbys Head cow who just had her calf a month ago went down last Sunday and could not get up! Called the vet and the first one did not know what to do. We have been proping her up against straw bales all week every hour or so. Been hard on all of us. The girls have been massaging the cow to keep the blood flowing, watering it in a gal bucket feeding it our dog cookies the only thing she would eat. The second Vet thought it might be "Grass Tetany" so Carol has been researching it. What causes it is when you have a fire and it burns the grass off the new grass that comes up is richer and the pot ash from the fire upsets the balance in the cows minerals. We have been giving the cow enamas with epson salt, IVs, electrolites all week. A cow that is nursing is more likely to have this problem in a ceral grain pasture and the one they were in was mostly Rye Grass. We are feeding the others alflfa along with having them on another pasture. We could not pick up the 1,500 lb cow to move her so I had to build her a shelter over top of her and keep her covered with a horse blanket to keep her warm in the rains we have been having. Well this morning she stood for the first time in 6-days and we are jumping for joy. It was a lot of work but we saved the cow. So this will be a nice weekend after all and we did not lose Sissy and her Calf Dark Wind is Nursing now again and will be OK to. Mark H.


TimC    Posted 05-25-2002 at 14:34:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
Thought of something else. My buddy Bruce raises everything. Goats, chickens, cows horses, beagles.

Had a cow in labor and the calf was turned around and had droped. He couldn't turn it so after several hours of trying he had to pull it.

Lost the calf and almost the cow. She wouldn't get up and he said he had seen cows like her just lay there and not recover. She wouldn't ever raise her head.

So, he took a feed sack and covered her head and start smacking her, pulling her ears and rubbing the sack all in her face til she got mad and chased him up the wall. He hung upside down from a rafter until she went to graze.

No more problems.


Mark Hendershot    Posted 05-25-2002 at 18:20:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
We tried to get her mad to get up but she was almost gone! Even now it is still hard for here to get aroud but she is eating hay now and 10,000% better then befor. Mark H.


TimC    Posted 05-25-2002 at 14:23:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
We hand milked a few when i was a kid. Once in a while they would get the scours. (the screaming squirts). Daddy would buy something called orimician crumbles. Bag about 10 pounds that looked like chicken feed. She wouldn't eat so he mixed it in an RC cola and turned her head up and forced down.

No more problems.


TimC    Posted 05-25-2002 at 14:22:42       [Reply]  [No Email]
We hand milked a few when i was a kid. Once in a while they would get the scours. (the screaming squirts). Daddy would buy something called orimician crumbles. Bag about 10 pounds that looked like chicken feed. She wouldn't eat so he mixed it in an RC cola and turned her head up and forced down.

No more problems.


Greg VT    Posted 05-25-2002 at 10:52:04       [Reply]  [Send Email]
ALRIGHT! You and your girls should be right proud of yourselves.

Nice barn too. I've been planning a much smaller version for an equipment shed but after seeing yours I might hafta get the chainsaw out and take down a few more trees.


Mark Hendershot    Posted 05-25-2002 at 12:16:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
The core cost of the building is big, but when you get past that point it dose not cost as much to make it bigger as to build another one. You can make them a third bigger but the cost won't be a third more. Keep that in mind when you do yours. Mark H.


Hogman    Posted 05-25-2002 at 09:34:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
Magnesium(sp) Mark, Early Spring You should be feedin a good quality mineral thats heavy on Mag. Things to watch for,standing in pond,sore joints,stiffness,strange lookin hocks. I have never heard of burned pastures alone casusin any problems tho it could be.
Whatever, Just remember ,early Spring,lush grass,feed'em mag!IMPORTANT!!!!
Hogman dmv licence confered by cowplop collage dayaftertamorra.
PS Scours are normal just so long as They can't hit tha side of tha barn from 20 feet. Shoulder high........
One last, I gotta tell this'un. We got a new Vet some years back,was fresh outta school. Had a sick hog and was'nt real sure what it was so called tha newbbe. He came out ,real proffesional like looked Her over, pondered a bit and asked "what do You think it is?" Now I figured He's just wantin ta make conversation'er else e's mabe lookin for a clue but right quick He says "thats what I think" made out a bill and left. I was not impressed! few days later Neighbor called Him out for sick Sow(say that fast) He goes thru tha same routine, like tha Neighbor said, "might as well called a fence post". Was'nt too long till tha Young Feller closed shop,went ta tha State " U"as a DVM TEACHER. Kinda scary ain't it???????? He was a nice Young man tho.............Mabe Your first Vet was tought there........which makes Ya wonder about tha second'un. Shucks, We don't even have a Vet here anymore,good bad er indifferant.


Mark Hendershot    Posted 05-25-2002 at 12:12:49       [Reply]  [No Email]
It seems we have another starting with those symtoms been giving her Magnessium enimas to her. She is responding fast. We are now feeding hay to them again. All this new grass is coming up all over due to all the rain we have had lately! It has been sprinkling for a week now off and on just right for it to come up fast. Never had this problem for 3 years just this year after the fire burned the grass off and no old was left and rich green stuff pokeing up all over. I bet they lose some cows on the open range soon! They are out and nobodys watching them. What is it you give yours for this other than the salt blocks? Is it something you can get at the feed store? Mark H.


Grove r    Posted 05-25-2002 at 07:15:02       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi, Mark, that was a real bummer, but glad everything turned out OK. Have had a couple instances, here, for different reasons, where a cow could not stand. used some three by twelve fir planks sixteen feet long to make a tripod over the animal. made a sling out of a big canvase bag, nylon rope and spreaders over the cows back, and a chain fall to lift, at least twice a day, to keep circulation going. It works! This was all before a tractor with a loader big enough to do the job, now, have not had to do that!

Sure good to see the barn comming along so well, that is going to be one nice building!!!

Have yourself a gooder, R.E.L.


Mark Hendershot    Posted 05-25-2002 at 07:44:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
We found a Cow Sling for 120.00 that I think we will get now. If we could have moved her and got her up for a while it would have been a lot easier to deal with. Moving cows is not easy!! Mark H.


Trina    Posted 08-02-2008 at 20:51:49       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Where did you find the sling?


Grove r    Posted 05-25-2002 at 08:15:56       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi, Mark, moving a cow that is down is not too difficult at all, a sheet of plywood,half or three quarter inch, some rope, or even chain,- put the plywood on the ground long ways along the cows back, takes two people, put a couple short ropes around her ankles on the bottom legs, front and back, and roll her over on her back, onto the plywood, only takes a secound or two, put the chain or rope around the end of the plywood, to the tractor, and you are set to go. Moved a big old holstien cow that way, over a quarter of a mile, no problems. Have a gooder, R.E.L.


Clem    Posted 05-25-2002 at 14:15:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Well, I guess you could call that a cow boat. Wear your ETD badge with pride.


Grove r    Posted 05-25-2002 at 18:29:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi, Clem, how ya bin? Haven't heard from ya for so long, I thought maybe you were driving that last ETD in the sky... Yeah that is what is called a cowboat, you must remember hearing about the "bull boats" from Scotland? well these were tried at the same time, but didn't work out, they kept getting swamped by the bull boats, seems that the hides for the cow boats were in estrous, and the bull boats kept trying to mount them, sinking with all hands......have a gooder, R.E.L.


Mark Hendershot    Posted 05-25-2002 at 08:24:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
Thanks for the idea!! I could make that set up a lot cheaper then the sling! That would be easyer on the cow to! Thanks, Mark H.


Grove r    Posted 05-25-2002 at 10:55:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
Thanks, Mark, sorry for the double post, must have my finger in secound and my mind in neutral, catch ya later, R.E.L.


Grove r    Posted 05-25-2002 at 08:15:36       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi, Mark, moving a cow that is down is not too difficult at all, a sheet of plywood,half or three quarter inch, some rope, or even chain,- put the plywood on the ground long ways along the cows back, takes two people, put a couple short ropes around her ankles on the bottom legs, front and back, and roll her over on her back, onto the plywood, only takes a secound or two, put the chain or rope around the end of the plywood, to the tractor, and you are set to go. Moved a big old holstien cow that way, over a quarter of a mile, no problems. Have a gooder, R.E.L.


DeadCarp    Posted 05-25-2002 at 07:05:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
It's rough when they get to where they're ailin.
We had a grey mare years ago, Nance, and she helped with everything while we were building the farm, from picking rock to plowing to digging the basement. Finally that last winter she got stiff & we had to grab her tail & help her get up. Sometimes even a boost helps. Glad Sissy's back from vacation. :)


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