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Country Discussion Topics
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Pretty Good Info
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GeneSC    Posted 02-23-2005 at 16:30:12       [Reply]  [No Email]
Got this in email, pretty good advice.

Good Information!
>
>
>
> SCENE 1 A friend went to the local gym and placed his belongings in the
> locker. After the workout and a shower, he came out, saw the locker open,
> and thought to himself, "Funny, I thought I locked the locker. Hmmmmm."
>
>
>
> He dressed and just flipped the wallet to make sure all was in order.
>
>
>
> Everything looked okay - all cards were in place. A few weeks later his
> credit card bill came - a whooping bill of $14.000! He called the credit
> card company and started yelling at them, saying that he did not make the
>
> transactions.
>
>
>
> Customer care personnel verified that there was no mistake in the system and
> asked if his card had been stolen. "No," he said, but then took out his
> wallet, pulled out the credit card, and yep you guessed it a switch had been
> made. An expired similar credit card f rom the same bank was in the wallet.
> The thief broke into his locker at the gym and switched cards. Verdict: The
>
> credit card issuer said since he did not report the card missing earlier, he
> would have to pay the amount owed to them. How much did he have to pay for
> items he did not buy? $9,000! Why were there no calls made to verify the
> amount swiped?
>
>
>
> Small amounts rarely trigger a "warning bell" with some credit card
> companies.
>
>
>
> It just so happens that all the small amounts added up to big one!
>
>
>
>
>
> SCENE 2 A man at a local restaurant paid for his meal with his credit card.
>
>
>
> The bill for the meal came, he signed it, and the waitress folded the
> receipt and passed the credit card along. Usually, he would just take it
> and place it in his wallet or pocket. Funny enough, though, he actually
> took a look at the card and, lo and behold, it was the expi red card of
> another person.
>
>
>
> He called the waitress and she looked perplexed. She took it back,
> apologized, and hurried back to the counter under the watchful eye of the
> man. All the waitress did while walking to the counter was wave the wrong
> expired card to the counter cashier, and the counter cashier immediately
> looked down and took out the real card. No exchange of words - nothing!
>
>
>
> She took it and came back to the man with an apology. Verdict: Make sure
> the credit cards in your wallet at yours. Check the name on the card every
> time you sign for something and/or the card is taken away for even a short
> period of time. Many people just take back the credit card without even
> looking at it, thinking that it has to be theirs.
>
>
>
> FOR YOUR OWN SAKE, DEVELOP THE HABIT OF CHECKING YOUR CREDIT CARD EACH TIME
>
> IT IS RETURNED TO YOU AFTER A TRANSACTION!
>
>
>
>
>
> SCENE 3 Yest erday I went into a pizza restaurant to pick up an order that I
> had called in. I paid by using my Visa Check Card which, of course, is
> linked directly to my checking account. The young man behind the counter
> took my card, swiped it, then laid it flat on the counter as he waited for
> the approval, which is pretty standard procedure. While he waited, he
> picked up his cell phone and started dialing. I noticed the phone because
>
> it is the same model I have, but nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Then
> I heard a click that sounded like my phone sounds when I take a picture. He
> then gave me back my card but kept the phone in his hand as if he was still
> pressing buttons.
>
>
>
> Meanwhile, I'm thinking: I wonder what he is taking a picture of, oblivious
> to what was really going on. It then dawned on me: the only thing there was
> as my credit card, so now I'm paying close attention to what he is doing.
> He set his phone on the counter, leaving it open. About five seconds later,
> I heard the chime that tells you that the picture has been saved. Now I'm
> standing there struggling with the fact that this boy just took a picture of
>
> my credit card.
>
>
>
> Yes, he played it off well, because had we not had the same kind of phone, I
> probably would never have known what happened.
>
>
>
> Needless to say, I immediately canceled that card as I was walking out of
> the pizza parlor. All I am saying is, be aware of your surroundings at all
> times. Whenever you are using your credit cards, take caution and don't be
> careless. Notice who is standing near you and what they are doing when you
> use your card. Be aware of phones because many have a camera phone these
> days. When you are in a restaurant and the waiter/waitress brings your card
> and receipt for you to sign, make sure you scratch the number off.
>
>
>
> Some restaurants are using only the last four digits, but a lot of them are
> still putting the whole thing on there. I have already been a victim of
> credit card fraud and, believe me, it is not fun. The truth is that they
> can get you even when you are careful, but don't make it easy for them.
>
>


Dale Anne    Posted 02-24-2005 at 05:44:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Howdy ya'll...I have been a victim of credit card theft just like these examples....years ago I got a JC Penney bill come to the house and threw it into the pile of bills to be paid over the weekend....I expected the bill to be a bit more then usual cause my son ,sister in law and mother in law had all gone to the mall school clothes shopping fer the kids.....well weekend came and I opened the bill a lil over $1800.00 had been charged to the account!...I grabbed my purse and looked in the wallet and yes my card was in it!....I called the card company and told them false charges had been put on my account....we talked about it and I noticed that while I was in cherry hill NJ with family at the mall someone else was at the gallery charging on my account...I explained that I had reciets and family to prove where I was at the time charges were being made in the gallery...I was told to go and make a police report which I did....the cops treated me like a criminal cause I had my card!!!...i kept looking and looking at the charges and noticed that everything was gear towards a man and a woman...I called some of these stores and asked if they had vidoe camers...yeah well most due but few are kept for a month so I was out of luck...so I asked them to pull up the sales and tell me what size the clothing and such was[i had suspected my sister had stolen the card] well everything that was bought would have fit her right down the the bra sizes...the male clothing I couldnt figure out since my nephew was only 3 at the time....I confronted my sister saying JC Penny had taped her on camera and she confessed...I called JC Penneys and told them.....at the end the cops did nothing, I was charged $50.00 and the false charges were taken off my bill....my sister and I stopped talking for 7 years...I never got paid back that $50.00.....and the part that pissed me off the most she bought stuff fer her at the time bf and nothing fer my nephew...now ya think she took the card out of my wallet huh?...nope she used an ole statement of mine to order a duplicate card...JC Penny at the time[dont know if still does this] never changes the Nubers on the cards after they expire!,reported stolen!,or duplicates sent out.....so beware...Dale Anne


Hey Flicker    Posted 02-23-2005 at 16:42:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Good info.

Unfortunately, I work for a company that provides some data to these types of companies (namely ChoicePoint). There are hundreds of ways to steal your identity. It does not matter one bit if your credit is bad or you just filed bankruptcy. I am all too familiar with the need for proper security when it comes to sensitive data. Its a scary thing.

If I send out credit applications to 60 banks (I can do that online in about 4-5 hours), I will guarantee at least 3 or 4 will give me a credit limit of at least $500 no matter how bad my credit is.

J posted down below. I replied. This deal with ChoicePoint is a major scandal that just has not been publicized by the media. ChoicePoint already has one class action lawsuit against them. There are more to follow. I will also guarantee that you;ll find out about more and more identities that have been stolen from the data ChoicePoint provided.

Trust me the crap has not hit the fan on this one yet. There will be laws and various peices of legislation created as a result of this. In MO, there were over 1500 people who had their data stolen from ChoicePoint (if you can believe ChoicePoint). I wonder if I will get a letter from them in the mail.

Identity theft is real. Its is not only for people who have good credit or a lot of money. It happens to lots of people and can completely ruin their financial situation.

Stay tuned for more on this story.

- Peanut


Dave Smith    Posted 02-23-2005 at 18:22:50       [Reply]  [Send Email]
If you kill some one who stole you're identity, Are you committing murder or suiside?
Dave <*)))><


sawtooth    Posted 02-23-2005 at 19:52:18       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Good question when it's your identity. Here's what just happened to me. A month or so ago I was in the bank, wife was along which was unusual. Business was slow, the teller asked me if I'd like to put my name in for a drawing they were having. She said not many had entered so your chance of winning is good. So I signed a card. My wife talked to a friend that works at that bank, told her about the drawing. Friend said "what he filled out was a credit card application". Sure enough a couple days ago in the mail came a credit card from that bank. My wife agrees that the teller never said it was a credit card promo. This morning I wanted to nip it in the bud- cancel the card. So I called the phone number on the letter with the card. Soon as the computer answered it said "please enter your 16 digit card number" When I did it said "thank you for activating your credit card"! No other choices! I wanted some option to tell the computer or live person that I don't want the card- no such opportunity. What skulldudgery that they FORCE this on you! My daughter in a law office says I'll have to send a letter to the company requesting to be cancelled. Sometimes I think it would be fun to get all the credit you can, run up all the debt you can and skip the country!


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