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Country Discussion Topics
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Making milk
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garry    Posted 06-07-2002 at 18:45:59       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi yo all, just a small farmer here in nz, need recipe for making milk with plenty of cream in it and or a trim milk,plus home made cheese, can any bodyhelp please
ta
garryb


Jerry S    Posted 06-11-2002 at 10:36:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
You got a cheese recipe and you can adjust your cream amount by the breed of animal you are milking. Our dairy science teacher told us that really lower fat milk could be obtained from humans than bovines. Problem is, they have to come fresh first. Then you have that offspring to compete with.


Burrhead    Posted 06-08-2002 at 11:16:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
On the serious side--

To have alot of cream in your milk you need to feed the producer plenty of good feed with high protein and RFV (feed value) no matter if you milk a cow or a goat.

To have trim milk you just separate the cream from your milk to end up with skim milk.

Here's a link to some good info from right here at KL.


screaminghollow    Posted 06-08-2002 at 00:57:22       [Reply]  [Send Email]
we raise goats and a friend occasionally has too much milk from his dairy. This works for both cows milk, sheeps milk and goat milk. Heat a gallon of milk up to 180 degrees, slowly so as not too scorch it. Keep it at 180degrees(fahrenheit) for ten minutes. Add a tablespoon of vinegar at a time and stir lightly after each one. Depending one the type of milk, it may take two or four tablespoons of vinegar per gallon. the milk will curdle, separating into white mushy lumps and greenish clear liquid. Strain the separated milk through a clean open weave cloth, cheese cloth is nice but other will work. ie the corner's of the cloth so as to form a bag and then hang it up over a bowl or sink to let it drain. After twenty-four hours, you will have a soft cheese about the consistency of riccota cheese. My family adds spices to make a cheese spread. chopped chives, a little salt, some garlic, diced pimento,whatever suits your fancy. As for the whey, the greenish clear liquid, I add pour it on the dry dog food. The dogs like it. I've made sheese with cultures and rennet and even toasted the curds to make cheddar, this is by far the easiest recipe there is. (Short of calling a Hickory farms store)


Make milk?    Posted 06-07-2002 at 19:40:55       [Reply]  [No Email]
Squeeze the cow.


Grove r    Posted 06-07-2002 at 20:56:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
Not the whole cow! just specific parts thereof, mainly the teats, centralized just ahead of the rear undercarriage, pointing down, usualy four, hand size, [for conveinience], squeze contents into bucket, [milk], pumping tail does NOT work! For further instruction, go to "Operators Handbook" if supplied, usualy just with pedigreed animals. Cheese? good on toast, or macaronni, can be eaten raw. Have a gooder R.E.L.

P.S. Putting the cow on her back for a couple hours before milking, does not make the cream rise to the top, reason being; milk has to be cold before this event can take place, mind you, have not tried putting the cow in a walk in cooler...


DeadCarp - oh c'mon you guys --    Posted 06-07-2002 at 21:16:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
Maybe the poster is serious here! You know very well that milk comes from Holsteins and cream comes from Fresians! That's cuz them Fresians are selectively bred to have longer legs so their udders will be higher! Jerseys and Guernseys are higher yet but they're too high for a farmer's budget, which normally gets stretched lengthwise to go from year to thar. (Just goes to show - if ya want something done right ----- :)


Grove r, I appologize......    Posted 06-07-2002 at 22:43:27       [Reply]  [No Email]
for being so crass and ambiguous.....you are absolutely right in your chastisement, please accept my sincerest appologies.......

In having a farming background, it should have been absolutely clear that brown cows, do, in fact, give brown milk, and that Black Angus give black milk, proof being in the color of their calves...of course this leads to the observation that Brown Swiss cows are the progenitors of that traditionaly great delicacy....Swiss Cheese! served with a side order of ham hocks and sour krout with dark rye, followed in turn with Black Forest Hunting cake, topped with seven minute icing done in six....while embibing Heinikin ale......will surely land you in intensive care, for heart palpitations, and a runny nose!

ETDer's unite! have a gooder R.E.L.


Hogman    Posted 06-08-2002 at 12:48:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
SIR! I take exception to Your prior statement wherein You did indeed say and I quote "milk must be cold for the cream to rise" hence Your insinuated need for placing said bovine in cooler prior to inverted extraction process.It was assertained over a lengthy period of time as a manualy operated milk extracter that indeed cream will rise on warm milk therefore negating the aforementioned need of cooler treatment.
My only question and one that would require much deliberation; should the milk pail be inverted above the milk dispensers or should an effort be made to simply allow the streams to arc over into an upright depository? J.Algenon Snodgrass Esq


DeadCarp - process for milking inverted cows    Posted 06-08-2002 at 14:58:11       [Reply]  [No Email]
Excellent point about the combination of cooling and inverting said bovine, and the poster has quite eloquently described the resultant milk pail direction quandry. Might I suggest an alternative method of extracting the cream:

Place the bovine in an inverted but comfortable position in something resembling a cow-sized hammock. Have the neighbors help you wheel the whole contraption into the nearest cow-in cooler, keeping the cow distracted and amused by tossing handfuls of alfalfa towards her head. You hurry ahead and affix yourself inverted by attaching the loops on your tenners to the overhead meat-hooks.

Once the missus delivers the sterilized aluminum ice-cube trays, a handful of tongue depressors and wheelbarrowful of beer to the cooler, ask her if that's the phone you hear ringing, cuz this is rapidly developing into a man-sized operation and i'll almost guarantee it ain't gonna be pretty!

Having drilled 4 holes thru the bottom of the ice-cube tray, lick each hole in turn and quickly stick it to the nearest moist frozen teat. Eventhough I can visualize the operation so far, I'm not sure what to do next - somebody else explain the rest while i grab another beer! LOL




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Grove r    Posted 06-08-2002 at 14:45:51       [Reply]  [No Email]
Certainly! Either method will do fine. If the ambient temperature is negative in it's perspective, the milk will surely adhere to the resepticle, if care is taken to rotate the dispencer suficeintly to coat the inner perimiter of said receptical with a diversifying spray of liquid in a quantity no greater than will solidify at a predetrmined rate.

"Arching" will also require a suitable, workable formula based on the pressure applied to dispenser, height and length of arch of fluid, milk, times velocity, will equal distance of recepticle, from trajectory source. Timmeing of pressure impulses at trajectory source will not significantly affect the equation.

Do hope I have clarified the situation somewhat. have a gooder, R.E.L.


Hogman***BY GEORGE GENTLEMEN    Posted 06-09-2002 at 11:10:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
I THINK WE HAVE JOINTLY REACHED SOME SEMBULANCE OF A PROPER ANSWER TO THE PRIOR STATED QUANDERY. NOW IF UNCLE BURR CAN HOLD THA PESKY PETA PEOPLE AT BAY LONG ENOUGH AND MARK WILL BE NICE ENOUGH TA LOAN A FEMALE OF THA BOVINE SPECIA WHICH IS CAPABLE OF EJECTIN MILK FROM HER MAMMERIES WE MIGHT PROCEED WITH APPLICATION OF THA AFOREMENTIONED CONCLUSIONS .

EVOE I SAY


Grove r    Posted 06-09-2002 at 13:23:09       [Reply]  [No Email]
Mr. George Gentleman;

Please accept my gratitude for the positive response,shown by yourself, on the aforementioned response to the queery, "How to Make Milk". I feel confident in the fact that we can overcome most any obsticle put in our colective path. As the former great British Prime Minister once said "United we stand, devided we fall"! to this point, I have not heard a "crash", obviously some truth in the metaphore.

In closing, I would like to congratulate everyone for their input into the timely solving of this perplexing dilema. Thank you one and all.

Have a Gooder,

R.E.L.


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