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Country Discussion Topics
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How do you protect the contents of your freezer???
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D. Mosey    Posted 06-19-2002 at 03:54:43       [Reply]  [No Email]
I'm guessin that most of us live on a co-op electric system. Just about every time there is a good thunder storm, ice storm, or when someone takes out a pole in an accident: we lose our electric power. This past spring high winds took down trees along the right-of-way and we lost power... If you live in the country you loose power from time to time. And now that is what bring up my question for all of you:

Without buying generator & the proper hook up equipment-

WHAT ARE YOUR IDEAS ON KEEPING THE FOODSTUFFS IN YOUR FREEZER SAFE FOR A 2-3 DAY OUTAGE?

Now, I understand that it don't do no good to open the durn thing while the power is out-

We got a neighbor that even duct tapes around the seal on theirs... any other ideas?


D.Mosey    Posted 06-19-2002 at 17:42:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
Thanks for the advice. I'll crank ours down a notch or two.


Dennis    Posted 06-19-2002 at 13:21:51       [Reply]  [Send Email]
PS
I'll send plns to anyone who wants them. Just be aware this is an emergency generator system and not a professional one.
Just email me your snail mail address.


DeadCarp - oh lordy    Posted 06-19-2002 at 10:39:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
The advice given is so good, i can only add this:

1) Keep the kids out of the garage. (or wherever the freezer is) Period. Wire the freezer right into a breaker so it can't be unplugged by the missus or anbody else it's better not to tangle with. Weld the breaker box shut. Install a sturdy padlock and automatic alarm system on the freezer. Wrap everything in old Playboys - they make superb insulation.

2) Discourage everybody around you from ever using power anything, lest they set it down and forget to plug the freezer back in. Shock them until they remember.

3) To avoid accusations of favoritism, run at least 7 GFI receptacles to an area that they CAN enter. Don't finish the wiring.

4) Move any bear heads, extra geese, deer hides or
anything that crawls before it stinks to the house freezer where people have to regulary look at it.

5) Grab your long-gun & go to bed in the freezer.
Every nite you give up & come shivering to bed at midnite, the freezer's fine! If you should ever wake up & crawl out to sunshine, contact a forklift operator and HAZMAT fast!




Dennis    Posted 06-19-2002 at 08:11:31       [Reply]  [Send Email]
There are some inexpensive ways to build a small generating system out of a car alternator and lawn mower engine.
If you email me your snailmail address I'll send you the plans. It really is very simple.
Dennis


Mark Hendershot    Posted 06-19-2002 at 07:33:59       [Reply]  [No Email]
You can just get a small generator and plug the freezer into it. Your investment would be real small (500.00 to 600.00) for the peace of mine knowing you can have a few lights and your food won't rot. Mark H.


screaminghollow    Posted 06-19-2002 at 07:16:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thetre are somethings you can do to "discourage" your freezer contents from thawing out.
1. Keep it set for zero degrees fahrenheit, colder than most are set at. (I've heard that meat and veggies will keep for six moonths longer than when kept at 10 degrees)
2. Use a chest freezer, when it is opened, the heavier cold air stays in the freezer, In an upright all the cold air pours right out on the floor.
3. Keep the freezer full, even if it means filling milk jugs with water and freezing them.
Also, it don't hurt to freeze things like pasta and flour, freezing helps preserve them too.
4. Don't keep the freezer in a hot enclosed porch. Best place is a cool dry basement. We have two, one is kept in the utility room with the washer and dryer.

We had a bad storm two weeks ago and the lectric was out for thirty six hours. The stuff in the freezer, had just warmed up to about 25 degrees, the only thing close to ruined, was that the ice cream got soft.


Jerry S    Posted 06-19-2002 at 13:25:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
Those were excellent suggestions. I will take that thought a bit further. The part about 10 degrees is more fact than some people realize. Once you get below freezing, you don't worry about bacteria much but you have to worry about other things. At 10 degrees, there is a fraction of the water in your food that is not solid although most is. The water is not all solid until it gets to 0 or below. WHen part of the water is not solid, you get a migration of water into bigger ice chrystals and that is what makes Ice cream start tasting bad and it will also ruin meat, vegetables and such over time. In meat, the larger ice chrystals puncture the muscle cells and so when it thaws, it is tougher to eat. I keep a good thermometer in my freezer and keep it below 0 all the time.


Jerry S    Posted 06-19-2002 at 13:25:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
Those were excellent suggestions. I will take that thought a bit further. The part about 10 degrees is more fact than some people realize. Once you get below freezing, you don't worry about bacteria much but you have to worry about other things. At 10 degrees, there is a fraction of the water in your food that is not solid although most is. The water is not all solid until it gets to 0 or below. WHen part of the water is not solid, you get a migration of water into bigger ice chrystals and that is what makes Ice cream start tasting bad and it will also ruin meat, vegetables and such over time. In meat, the larger ice chrystals puncture the muscle cells and so when it thaws, it is tougher to eat. I keep a good thermometer in my freezer and keep it below 0 all the time.


bob ny    Posted 06-19-2002 at 06:35:45       [Reply]  [No Email]
welive 2200 feet from the county road although our electric has never gone down we have alot of outages the first thing we bought was a genertor
a small unit (5500 ) for under 800.00 i wired a
whole new system in the house just for water pump,refrigator,furnace,freezer one extra double
wall socket for radio and light i also converted
the gen to operate on propane or gasoline we feel
it has paid for it self 4 fold in 3 years i run it every two weeks under a load all year long


cornfused    Posted 06-19-2002 at 05:36:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
If you don't want to buy a generator the only thing I know to do is pray!


D. M.    Posted 06-19-2002 at 07:30:59       [Reply]  [No Email]
Well cornfused- not everybody got the money to buy a generator... while I fully agree with prayer
I'd also like to hear of some good home spun remedies for a common country problem...


cornfused    Posted 06-19-2002 at 07:43:15       [Reply]  [No Email]
I didn't mean that in a bad way, I just didn't know of any other way to keep it cold. We bought a generater after an ice storm kept us in the dark for 5 days, only needed it once after that but I think it was a good investment. Sorry if I offended you.


D.M.    Posted 06-19-2002 at 13:22:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
No offense taken cornfused. My G'ma taught me not to ask for advice if I wasn't prepared to hear the answer. Have a good one-


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