Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Molasses/alcohol
[Return to Topics]

harshad v    Posted 07-19-2002 at 04:35:25       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Does any body have an answer to increase ethanol content during sugarcane molasses fermentation by yeast....


June    Posted 09-04-2002 at 19:03:41       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Molasses is distilled into rum. Find a site which gives directions for making a crockpot into a still. It won't make much rum but it would be a fun experiment. If you make too much, then the government men will be after you. Once you have tried rum can 'shine' be far behind.


Dennis in Ma    Posted 07-19-2002 at 06:56:44       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Be real careful how much molasses you make. History might repeat itself !!!

See link below...........


Ludwig    Posted 07-19-2002 at 10:53:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
There are still places around the city where you can smell it.


Salmoneye    Posted 07-19-2002 at 04:58:34       [Reply]  [Send Email]
If I remember my Plant and Animal Physiology from school correctly, you can only ferment anything to a certain point before the alcohol starts killing the yeast.
'Home Brew' will only yeild an alcohol content around 13%...


MikeH-Tx    Posted 07-19-2002 at 05:24:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
For most yeasts that is true. There are some that are advertised to be able to go to about 18%. I have tried them and did not have any luck going above the normal 12-13%. Non-commercial winemakers use these yeasts to fix a "stuck" fermentation, where the original yeast gave up too soon.

Your advice to Harshad was best. Count on 12-13%. If you want it stronger, distill it (outside the US, where it is legal, of course).


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community