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Country Discussion Topics
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Trivia,Livestock Breeds, Fruit varieties of Bygone Days
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Spence    Posted 08-18-2002 at 19:49:13       [Reply]  [No Email]
I'm referencing a farm book circa 18XX. For copyright reasons I can't disclose much more.

A little 1890's trivia for a Sunday nite. Some of these breeds of livestock no longer exist. But their genes are probably passed on in the other breeds. No mention is made of the fresian milk breeds so I assume the dutch breeds finally predominates today. I was looking for references to swiss brown but it wasn't there.
If you gents with cattle experience can shed some light on this I'd appreciate it.

I recognise one half of the swine list has breeds that are common today, but the others I've never seen. The ones I know exist today are marked "*"

My source suggests the best cattle breeds for dairy are the shorthorn.

Some the fruit hybrids no longer exist either but I'd thought I'd list them too.

Cattle: Flemish
Gascon
Avergne
Breton

Swine: Dorsetshire *
York *
Essex
Chester
Augeron
Berkshire
Neapolitain
Poland China *
Tamworth
Normandy
Peregourd

Apples: Baldwin
Gravenstein
Northern Spy
King of Tompkins County
Clear Chronicles
Seedling Pippin
Canada Pippin
Red Winter Calville
Red Bellefleur
White Calville
Short Heneg
Myer's Noupareil
Wagener
Petosky
Canada Reinette

Pears: Hardenpoint Delight
Duchess of Angouleme
Bachelor Butter
Lord Esperen
Senator Vaisse
Count Counsellor
Nantes Butter
Winter Good Christian
Bergamotte
ButterSenior

Peaches: Large Mignone
Apricot Peach
Madetine Hartlet
Lord napier Favorite
Noblesse


Promise Land Ranch    Posted 08-19-2002 at 09:54:04       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Gascons are related to the Blonde d' Aquitaine and the Piedmontese. This breed has been developed into a beef breed that is widely used in its native region of France. Mature cows weigh 500 kg and stand 135 cm at the shoulder; bulls average 145 cm in height and 850 kg in weight.

I looked for the rest of the breeds but it seems that they have faded out completely. The probably were bred into other breeds or they became known as something else and the old name was forgotton.

Shelby


bob ny    Posted 08-19-2002 at 08:14:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
we used brown swiss oxen it the woods the largest one we had was babe who worked alone he weighed 2950 lbs when we got him he was 105bs
he was born friday the 13 th sept 1985 gone it 2000


Ira    Posted 08-19-2002 at 03:37:55       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Spence, I think the freisian became the Holstein-Freisian. I have a book copywrite 1906 that lists the Brown Swiss as a dual purpose breed rather than strictly a dairy breed.


Hogman    Posted 08-19-2002 at 03:15:20       [Reply]  [No Email]
Spence this will be of no help as is a negative report. However FWIW.

"Beef cattle science "by Ensminger.Mentions beef Friesian,dual purpose,imported from Ireland in 1971. In Europe dual-purpose-----in Us Holstein-Friesian has been developed as a Dairy breed. No referance to Brown Swiss and I have no dairy book.
Some cow calf operators use brown swiss for mama cows to get more milk for tha calves. To each His own but I think what is gained in milk growth is lost in tha feed lot and on tha rail,to wit, milkers is milkers'n beef is beef! IMHO

RE hogs, Chesters,Berkes and Tamworth are still very much alive. If I ever went back into Hogs I'd still base My breeding program on Yorkshire and Duroc but with a Berkshire terminal for a realy good solid lean hog with lots of bacon'n loin. THA GOOD STUFF that tha dadblamed Doc says I can't have no more. At least not tha bacon.


Spence    Posted 08-19-2002 at 07:32:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
If my arteries have plaque, it's due to Saturday mornings and that smell of bacon wafting up the stairs. The only way my wife can get me up
before 9 on the weekend.


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