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Country Discussion Topics
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Any ideas for a homemade culvert pipe?
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Mike D    Posted 09-12-2002 at 06:05:09       [Reply]  [No Email]
I see some good spots to put in a pipe or two and save the distance we got when we haul hay out to the farthest pasture. Wondering if there is a good substitute to the $200 pipes I see at the farm store. Not trying to be penny wise & pound foolish, just hoping that there is a good alternative to the expense.

Have had the good fortune to use some advice I got from you folks in the past. And have gotten some good tips from the YT site. I'm grateful to have a place to ask.


John Miller    Posted 03-26-2004 at 11:25:47       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Lets keep it simple, I am the Stormwater manager for the mid-size city. If a culver is need you have to think when it rains and the land all slopes to this point which you want to cross, any thing you put in (if not sized properly) will wash away. Any bridging material (large stones etc. ) will wash away. Hot water heater, 55gal drums etc. will rust out.

Is this a temp. fix, do you enjoy doing things over and over again?

The water shed that feeds this point needs to be determined, and the proper size culvert installed with proper headwalls. The new material on the market such as HDPE, are relativly cheap.

You may ask a retired eng. to help calculate the size of pipe needed and the proper headwall design required.

You may be just guessing and have it all washed away or cause this water to be diverted somewhere where it cause alot of damage.


Swamphandy    Posted 09-12-2002 at 18:52:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
$200 sounds really steep. I put my driveway in about 4 years ago and I think I paid around $50 or $60 for my 12' x 8" culver. Same grade that the county uses. Check with a construction company supply, there has to be a cheaper place to get one.

A side note, we found in the county records that our road commision pays $400 for the same culver. Go figure.

-Swamphandy


Slo    Posted 09-12-2002 at 16:53:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
I have seen old metal hot water heaters with the ends cut out used.


Slo    Posted 09-12-2002 at 16:52:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
I have seen old metal hot water heaters with the ends cut out used.


buck    Posted 09-12-2002 at 16:47:54       [Reply]  [No Email]

A couple of points here. Back around 1960 Dad and I used old metal drums for stream crossing and they are still in place today and the crossing is used for a main driveway entrance. Also if you should be near a concrete precaster that makes pipe they will sell or give you pipe that may not be up to spec. for utility work.


Ray    Posted 09-12-2002 at 14:20:18       [Reply]  [No Email]
Are you sure you need a culver? Unless a lot of water is running you can grade a drive across a
ditch, put stones (number two's) in the bottom,
and drive across.Culvers will wash out with
enough rain.The last one we put in was 6' across,
and we still have stone washing problems.


rhudson    Posted 09-12-2002 at 13:56:52       [Reply]  [Send Email]
if they are not too big for your spot, how about cutting the tops and bottoms out of plastic barrels and assembling them end to end?


Bob /Ont.    Posted 09-12-2002 at 08:51:11       [Reply]  [Send Email]
A couple of old water tanks might do the job for you Mike.
Later Bob


bob    Posted 09-12-2002 at 08:22:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
Mike I went to county maintance shed and bought a used {good [ culvert for 3>)) a ft. the couplers are a little spendy but then didn,t need one. you go to a farm sale and bidding sometimes gets carried away try your county road crew


bob    Posted 09-12-2002 at 08:21:32       [Reply]  [No Email]
Mike I went to county maintance shed and bought a used {good [ culvert for 3>)) a ft. the couplers are a little spendy but then didn,t need one. you go to a farm sale and bidding sometimes gets carried away try your county road crew


Les...fortunate    Posted 09-12-2002 at 08:18:45       [Reply]  [No Email]
In the past, we have used hollow logs. They last a long time buried in the ground, especially with light use.
Unfortunately you don't come across a good one very often. If anybody's logging in your area, check out their yard(s) and see what might be kicking around. They'd probly just give you one if they had one.


screaminghollow    Posted 09-12-2002 at 07:22:25       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I saw reprint of something in a magazine a year or two ago,(maybe Mother Earth News) about stacking tires and banding them tight into long tubes to use for culvert. Given the current fuss over mosquitoes and West Nile, I don't know that it is such a great idea, but all those ridged commercially available culverts may have a similar problem though.


JoeK    Posted 09-12-2002 at 06:33:57       [Reply]  [No Email]
In WI,township must provide 1 access per "40"to landowner.....Check with your town board and see if they have any used culverts(take-outs).Often a used culvert may be damaged on one end making it unusable for full roadwidth but still can be cut off or 2 short pieces joined into one.Check county shop also. Be adv you will prolly need "permission/OK" from whatever authority,Twn/Co/State/Village/City before altering ditch/installing driveway.


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