Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Help On Butcher Supplies?
[Return to Topics]

Culpeper VA    Posted 11-12-2002 at 12:38:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
Can anyone tell me the best place to purchase butcher supplies. Also, any good books on proper butchering. I am currently looking for a class to take if i can find one. I want to start butchering my own steers and hogs..Thank you in advance...


bob faas    Posted 04-09-2004 at 17:23:13       [Reply]  [Send Email]
looking to find out where I can get some prices on some stuff that we have here that would like to sell. Thank you in advance for your help.


Gary    Posted 11-13-2002 at 07:40:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
Look about the state to find bskeries or florists going out of business. You can sometimes find good deals on coolers in which you can hang your fresh kill until is cools and ages. Reassemble it on a concrete slab and build a roof over it. Check local meat markets or grocery store meat depts maybe find used band saws and meat grinders that need a little repair and tlc. I agree with Michelle, volunteer labor in a local slaughter house. Butchering is best learned through practical hands on experience, but a basic understanding of the process from a book is certainly beneficial in the beginning. Buy your skinning, boning kinves from the same supplier as local butchers or meat packing houses. Get some good sharpening stones and a good quality steel for touching up the edges. Good luck and try some cow tongue if you never have,,, it's delicious.


CulpeperCowboy    Posted 11-13-2002 at 12:22:05       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thank you for the information. I have tried cow tongue and it is good, we eat it when ever the store will get some in...

Good Evening


Michelle    Posted 11-12-2002 at 12:53:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
You know I thought it would be really hard, but its not, just hard work. If you have a band saw then you are a very blessed person. A carpenters sawsall works majic on spines and ribs(my husband giggles maniacly everytime he uses it because it uses to take him forever to do the same thing he now does in less than a minute) One book I love is called Stocking Up, it has tons of information on what cuts of meat come from where on the carcass. A really good skinning knife, really sharp knifes of different sizes, time, patience and buckets have slaughtered, butchered, wrapped and fed this family pigs, deer, steer, goat. The best way to learn isn't always in a book though, it's usually talking, watching, and helping someone who is already doing it. Offer your free labor to a local who does there own butchering.


CulpeperCowboy    Posted 11-12-2002 at 13:00:34       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Very good information. Thank you very much.. I have both saws...I am sure they will come in handy... Good Evening..


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community