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Country Discussion Topics
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I finally....
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Cindi    Posted 02-11-2003 at 07:06:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
...put those little pigs back in with their mother this morning. Her fever is gone and she seems to be doing much better. I was concerned she would be aggressive to the babies but after an inital 'brusk' she lay right down to nurse them. I would love for ya'll to see my bathtub right now. The smell in that bathroom is not to be believed and would put any roadhouse gas station men's room to shame. I was never so glad to see the backside of anybody going out the door in my life. Screaming little beggars. Two of them discovered how to climb out of the tub, using the others as a ladder I'm sure, and posted themselves just inside the bathroom door where they set to yelling at the tops of their lungs between feedings. I would not be at all surprised to go out to the pen later and find that mom had 'silenced' these two. Lucky she's in a crate. I realized somewhere along the line in the last forty eight hours that I was not going to surrogate these babies. I had it in my mind to keep them warm, clean, and keep their tummies full. By last night I was down to keeping them warm and not letting them starve. Their tummies don't ever appear to be full, and clean? HAH that's a big joke. I've washed no less than fifty towels in the last two days. Good thing mom's temperature went down because I don't think I would have made it another minute much less another day. I also THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR KIND WORDS OF ENCOURAGEMENT.....gave mom THREE count 'em THREE shots this a.m. I just jammed the needle in and shoved the medicine in. She barked and growled at me and spent the next few minutes cussing me, but the deed got done and then I talked to her and petted her and we made up. Until tomorrow. CRUD!


SHeiserman    Posted 02-11-2003 at 17:49:15       [Reply]  [No Email]
Like these pig stories.Was wondering if you sold pigs in a niche market, or to whoever wants one? Around here, not too many people would even take one.


Cindi    Posted 02-11-2003 at 18:30:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
At this time of year they sell pretty much by hoof weigth a dollar a pound. We have a fairly heavy hispanic customer pool. Our next breeding we will sell all the piglets for show and we are very selective about who is bred to whom. Those piglets go for one hundred dollars a head anywhere from thirty to sixty pounds. We sold our first fifty or so last year for this years fair. Got our fingers crossed that we might have a champion or a reserve, that would be a he11 of a boost for business this coming year.


Larry    Posted 02-11-2003 at 08:08:57       [Reply]  [Send Email]

It's always best to keep little pigs with their mothers as best as you can. Just keep track of how many times a sow feeds it's little ones and you will undertand why your little guy's were squeeling all the time.

I'm also happy to hear you are getting over that shot thing. I aways gave my sows shots out on the floor when I let them out to be fed. That's why I used such a heavy needle. One,it would unload a lot faster and two, there was less chance of breaking off a needle.Plus you had to kind of keep your wrist loose when you gave shots this way. That way when the sow took off you didn't bend the needle. But most of the time I gave them the shot while they were on the run anyway.


Tnx for Update....Jimbob..nt    Posted 02-11-2003 at 08:08:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
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Willy-N Try a littler of 10 Newfs!!    Posted 02-11-2003 at 08:06:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
Once when we were Breeding Newfoundland Kadie presented up with 10 wonderfull puppys! Then promley stopped produsing milk! Guess who became there new Mom! This involved weighing each puppy several times a day, feeding every 4 hours, 10 mike bottles being washed every time. Wiping the butts of every puppy to make them do there thing with a warm wash cloth (just like mom did) washing each puppy after each meal. At first it was not to hard but after a week it was draining all our reserves. Mixing formula, noting the weight of each one to get the amount right, clearing the nipples of the bottles all the time due to the bone meal cloging them up. So many towels and wash cloths used along with sheets in the welping box that the washer ran allmost all day. I had to buy Goats Milk for them at the store and at first that was easy but it was up to 1 gal a feeding twords the end. I cleaned out every store in town and they were ordering it for us by the case!! The feedings got more time between them as it got closer to 8 weeks but we were sleeping on the couch with alarms set to wake up all night long and during the day. You can't belive how much work a Mom must do to raise a litter till you do it yourself. Even tho these puppys were worth 1,000.00 each and all of them were sold allready you still just wanted to throw up you hands and quit. We stuck it out and they all turned into Great Dogs and went to there new homes. After it was over we felt better but never raised another litter from then on. Just to much work to do if it happen again. Mark H.


cowgirlj    Posted 02-11-2003 at 07:27:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Maybe we will stay away from pigs.......we had been concidering a few, but geez Cindi, I dunno. In your bath tub? LOL
I'm glad thier Momma is getting better, and giving you some breathing space.
j


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