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Country Discussion Topics
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Solar chargers-
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Looking for some honest to goodness fencing advice.    Posted 02-26-2003 at 20:22:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
High tensile fence. Five strand. How much charger for a perimeter fence for 40 acres? This is still a country site ain't it? (More than a hobby - less than a living)


Linda    Posted 02-27-2003 at 13:50:12       [Reply]  [No Email]
We have two solar powered 12V Par-Mak chargers and have used them on separate pastures for about 8 years. We replaced one battery about 3 years ago, but otherwise have been troublefree. The 12V does hold bulls. Buying locally or from Nasco is about the same cost, but I believe the suggested retail on Par-Mak's website is more than we paid.


Lynch    Posted 02-27-2003 at 10:44:29       [Reply]  [Send Email]
valu-bilt.com has many different chargers listed. And they are happy to answer any questions you have. Just pull up the home page and click on fencing and then they have a long list of supplies.


Foz    Posted 02-26-2003 at 23:24:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
This reminds me of a story from a few years back. I was out at my brothers place ,and we had just unloaded some equipment of the back of my truck. I had a 1ton with a 10' diamond plate bed on it with some left over corn scatterins from feeding deer a while earlier. Well his prize billy smelled the corn an put his front feet up on the back of the bed. By this time my brother had turned the fence back on and I noticed there was only bout 3" tween that fence and the bare spot under that billys tail.that poor goat stepped back just a hair hit that fence and that made his tail clampdown on that wire and then we had really loud screaming boargoat set sail clear over the cab on my truck. I bet that goat was knockin 50 miles an hour when landed! Never would come up to the truck after that neither, go figger?


rhudson    Posted 02-26-2003 at 23:10:33       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hello,
Been using ac and solar of one type or the other for 30 years. started out with the parkmar (spelling) 6 volt. good solid boxes but not enough energy. i've settled down to use the Gallagher (spelling again). but, i make my own charging package from panels i get from surplus electrical sales. i start with an old tv dish mount (lots of them in junkyards), use 1 inch angle to make a panel mount. then i silicone the panels into this mount. the high energy fence chargers use lots of battery power, so you need fairly large panels (about 25 watts worth or more) not so cheap. you will need a solar panel/battery charger controller to keep from over charging the battery. i have found them at Northern for around $40, but have found some surplus industrial quality ones for around $29. then a big deep cycle battery and plastic battery box. a three sided enclosure to protect the charge controller and fence charger. so my last set up to enclose 80 ac. with 5 strand HT. fence charger $300, batt $79, batt box $12, charge controller $40, two 10 watt solar panels about $200, misc. metal, galv.paint, silicone about $20. It's not so cheap is it. then the stuff you would need for any electric fence, lots of ground rods $60, lightening choke $20 (i make mine), a fence indicator light (Fi-shock), $15 and a good "smart" fence checker, about $100 (the best investment in electric fencing you can make, next to the fence charger itself). ok starting to ramble, here check this site: http://www.cattlemenscorner.com/ also http://www.fishock.com/

feel free to email me if you want to compare notes.


LH    Posted 02-26-2003 at 21:38:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
Ive tried several solar fencers, but by ar the best was the Parmak 6 volt low impedence, and it will handle up to 20 miles of fence. Mine finally died after 7 years from a lighting strike but Id buy another one if I needed it


Dennis    Posted 02-26-2003 at 21:16:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
Here is some help

http://www.rutland-electric-fencing.co.uk/electricshepherd/default.htm


mojo    Posted 02-26-2003 at 21:15:39       [Reply]  [No Email]
i haven't had good luck with solar, but the two "worst" ones were the ones i tried. one was "farm 'something' and the other i can't recall right now. try search on this site, but it's been 3 or 4 years ago, don't know how far back they cover things. if all 5 wires are hot you're looking at alot of power in a short length. come summer the bottom wires are going to be a problem. galleger (sp?) is pretty good and there is a good write up in successful farming magazine this month, check it out!
i have a mile of 'hot' high tensile, a half mile of 5 wire with two wire (top and middle) hot. i struggled with solar for 4 months and then went battery (deep cell). i'm still battery and will be until next spring when i go "online". still not too powerful tho since it is with horses.
batteries are easy to check/recharge/replace, with solar it works or thats it. i got fed up.
sorry i'm not more beneficial, but at least i know where you're coming from and have been there.
good luck and i'll post more if i can dig it up, you know, research/save/lose! ;-)


bill    Posted 02-26-2003 at 20:32:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
think ya got the wrong place here all they wanna do is talk about stupid stuff just read all the shutt below


Dennis    Posted 02-26-2003 at 21:12:35       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hey Bill,
Did your sister get the dog cured of the skin disease?


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