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Country Discussion Topics
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Putting in a well
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countrygurl    Posted 03-12-2003 at 06:31:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
hello,
we are thinking of putting in a well, (southwestMS) is there anything we should know in advance about putting in a well
thnaks for any info


Pitch    Posted 03-12-2003 at 15:18:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
I just had one put in last summer. People will probably laugh but I had a water witch come out and dowsed my land for the spot. People were telling me that this was a bad spot to find water. Guy came out spent about an hour found three likely places on my 5 acres. Here in NY we have to be a minimum of 100' from the septic system. He marked a place and we had a driller come out and go to work. He had a pounding style rig, some folks say the rotaries will seal the vein off as they drill past. 5' of dirt 20feet of limestone and shale then dirt and sand again hit an artesian at 68' Got so much water I had to tile around the well to drain off the excess. Cost $2200 but I set my own pump and line to the house. County has to test for potability.


Scott Hansen    Posted 03-12-2003 at 15:58:50       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I get people telling me $20,000 for their well!!!!

You got it done for 10%! Man, I think people just get taken, sometimes.


Red Dave    Posted 03-12-2003 at 06:36:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
You might want to check with your state environmental department to see if they have any rules you must follow. Here the PA DEP has requirements like distance from septic system etc. mostly common sense stuff though.
Are you going to have a well drilling contractor drill it, or do it your self?


Scott Hansen    Posted 03-12-2003 at 07:37:06       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Dave! How would you do it yourself???


Ron from IL    Posted 03-12-2003 at 10:38:18       [Reply]  [No Email]
Scott,

DeepRock Mfg. from Opelika, AL sells the Hydra-Drill, a unit that allows you to drill your own well. I've owned one for twenty years, and drilled my own 75' well. It worked pretty well, but is a lot of work! It was much cheaper to do than hire a well driller to do it (with no garantee!). Depending on your circumstances, I'd recommend it over hiring it done, if you have the time and patience.

Ron


Ron from IL    Posted 03-12-2003 at 10:28:42       [Reply]  [No Email]
Scott,

DeepRock Mfg. from Opelika, AL sells the Hydra-Drill, a unit that allows you to drill your own well. I've owned one for twenty years, and drilled my own 75' well. It worked pretty well, but is a lot of work! It was much cheaper to do than hire a well driller to do it (with no garantee!). Depending on your circumstances, I'd recommend it over hiring it done, if you have the time and patience.

Ron


Scott Hansen    Posted 03-12-2003 at 11:53:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
This is a high pressure water drill? Or a water powered drill?


Ron from IL    Posted 03-12-2003 at 13:30:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
It's neither. The power head is a 4 h.p. Tecumseh 2-cycle engine, and a water/bentonite solution is pumped down the drill stem by a 3 h.p trash pump to bring up drill cuttings.

Ron


Ron from IL    Posted 03-12-2003 at 13:29:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
It's neither. The power head is a 4 h.p. Tecumseh 2-cycle engine, and a water/bentonite solution is pumped down the drill stem by a 3 h.p trash pump to bring up drill cuttings.

Ron


Scott Hansen    Posted 03-12-2003 at 14:26:49       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Why the solution?


Danny in CO    Posted 03-12-2003 at 09:07:26       [Reply]  [No Email]
Scott,

My FIL and I drilled a 140' well is East Texas by hand. We used a 6" auger with pipe extensions until we were about 60' down. Then we used a water driven drill. About 100' down, we hit a layer of limestone. It took a while to cut through it with the water drill.

Danny


Danny in CO    Posted 03-12-2003 at 09:02:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
Scott,

My FIL and I drilled a 140' well is East Texas by hand. We used a 6" auger with pipe extensions until we were about 60' down. Then we used a water driven drill. About 100' down, we hit a layer of limestone. It took a while to cut through it with the water drill.

Danny


Red Dave    Posted 03-12-2003 at 07:54:41       [Reply]  [No Email]
You can buy engine-powered augers that the sellers claim can be used for it. I think Northern has them in their catalogue. Seen them advetised other places too. I haven't heard of them being used around here because we have a lot of limestone and the water table isn't that shallow. I imagine something like that would be hard to hold on to if it caught a rock.
If you live where the ground is sandy and the water table isn't too far down, it ought to work though.
Before drilling rigs were around here they dug wells by hand. We had 4 of them on our farm, I think the guys that dug them must have been crazy, 'cause they sure looked deep from the top.


Scott Hansen    Posted 03-12-2003 at 08:00:05       [Reply]  [Send Email]
What about letting your tractor post hole digger do it? Do they make bits that would attach???


Red Dave    Posted 03-12-2003 at 08:07:08       [Reply]  [No Email]
Don't know, I never heard of trying that.


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