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Country Discussion Topics
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Snake hole
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Elizabeth    Posted 03-18-2003 at 10:47:13       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Does anyone have an idea for how I can repair or fill a snake hole that was made through the berm (levy) of my pond and now my pond water is leaking out through it. The hole is located near the center of the berm where the width of the berm from the water side to the outer side is about 8 foot. I thought of injecting concrete in there but, don't think it would set because of the oozing water from the hole. I thought someone here might just have that ingenious idea I'm looking for. Thanks, Elizabeth


Elizabeth    Posted 03-19-2003 at 07:20:30       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks for all the great ideas. The frogs have all emerged for spring and it's possible the hole was caused by a big ole bull frog. I believe I'll attempt to fix it with a combination of your ideas and I'll keep reading for any more.
Thanks again, Elizabeth


Yankee    Posted 03-18-2003 at 16:34:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
I work with concrete,and deliver it.We have poured for many fence and sign companys and if there is any water in the holes we pour it anyway,the concrete diplaces the water and the moisture helps the cureing.So as ron said use concrete.


Yankee    Posted 03-18-2003 at 16:33:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
I work with concrete,and deliver it.We have poured for many fence and sign companys and if there is any water in the holes we pour it anyway,the concrete diplaces the water and the moisture helps the cureing.So as ron said use concrete.


TB    Posted 03-18-2003 at 11:39:48       [Reply]  [No Email]
I don't think I would use concrete. Water will ooze along the edge of the concrete and leek again. You might try bennite I think it is called. Girandoles in a bag. Itís dry clay that will swell to several times its size. Work as much into the hole as possible and let it swell as it soaks up. It may work better than concrete.


TB    Posted 03-18-2003 at 11:56:26       [Reply]  [No Email]
correction bentonite I think?


Robert in W. Mi    Posted 03-18-2003 at 11:18:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
If you are talking about a small diameter hole, i see those around my ponds from time to time. I'd pound a "long round stake" into the hole deep enough so that you can cover over the top of it. Even though the stake is bigger than the hole, you should be able to pound it right in.
Worth a try,
Robert


Ron from IL    Posted 03-18-2003 at 11:08:44       [Reply]  [No Email]
Elizabeth,

First off, it's probably NOT a snake hole. Snakes don't make holes (despite popular belief). It's probably a crayfish hole--especially if there's a 'mound' around the hole. They are notorious for this, especially in an area where the water is closte to the surface. Snakes couldn't live in such an environment.

Secondly, concrete sets up even harder in a damp environment. Boats made of ferrocement were often sunk as part of the curing process. So feel free to pour concrete in the hole.

HTH

Ron


fredo    Posted 03-18-2003 at 17:38:25       [Reply]  [Send Email]
i have a farm that is diked and gets ground hog holes in the dike. i take the back hoe up on the dike and dig perpendicularto the burrow. put a piece of meatal or wommanized plywood across hole and bury it. if you bury wommanized don't tell on yourself.
fredo.


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