Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Tractor ?
[Return to Topics]

countrgurl601    Posted 03-19-2003 at 14:26:12       [Reply]  [Send Email]
hello,
might be buying a tractor, have seen many post about tractor on this site, any opions on 1940 something ford 9-n
thanks for any info


Hal/WA    Posted 03-20-2003 at 11:37:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
The N's are neat tractors and are probably the easiest of old tractors to get parts for. The later 8N's with the side mounted distributor, draft controlled 3 point and 4 speed transmissions are maybe a liitle more versatile and easier to deal with. The N's seem to hold their value very well.

There are some down sides though. The N's may be more expensive to buy than similar tractors, the hydraulic pump stops when you push in the clutch, the hydraulic pump capacity is puny, the available power is fairly low, no power steering is available except from the aftermarket and they are really not strongly built enough to do much loader work. The 9N has a front mounted distributor (hard to work on) and the brake pedals are on both sides of the tractor, which is downright unhandy when you want to apply the left brake and the clutch at the same time.

In my experience, a loader is the handiest and most used part of tractor ownership. I use my loaders almost every time I start a tractor. And while power steering is not mandatory with a loader, it sure makes the operation easier. An N can be equipped with a loader, but I think there are better choices in somewhat newer and larger tractors. You actually might spend less too.

Another thing to look at is if there is a tractor company relatively nearby that can and will work on the tractor you buy. You probably will need parts and may need help getting things fixed.

I would look around for a tractor that already has a loader, power steering, three point, good tires and runs good. It would be desirable to get live PTO and other options. I would suggest not getting an automatic type transmission. They tend to be troublesome and expensive to fix. Good luck!


Spence    Posted 03-19-2003 at 19:01:30       [Reply]  [No Email]
You should match up a tractor with how much land you have and what kind of work you will do
also. The 8N is a fine tractor with hi and lo
gearing. Before I bought my IH434 last month I was seriously looking at an 8N. Motor was A1 and everything was working. Asking price was 2300
whereas the IH ran me 3900. So with the 8N I could have spent the difference to give me an almost bran new 8N.

The N series tractors will give a HP in the twenties and provide enuff HP for most homestead work. The HP cannot compare with the modern garden tractors in the same HP range. This is because the N's are slow turning,heavy, mostly torque machines built for 100 acre farms of that era. So they had to be dependable and trouble free. I've heard some differing opinions, but most people agree that an 8N will take a rough going if your using a square
baler. But some say it will handle it if you take it easy. There are reliable 30 to 40 HP tractors
of that era that can handle heavier work like Cockshutt,MM,John Deere,Massey Harris/Fergusons,etc. Unless you want to take out a second morgage on your house, the pricier 20-40HP farm tractors of today will run you 15-30000$. These are the Kubotas,Bradsons,etc which are supposed to replace these oldies, but the CEO's forgot to remember that we folks are trying to make it to the next mortgage payment as well as farm.


pat    Posted 03-19-2003 at 18:28:51       [Reply]  [No Email]
as has been stated,, more info on the use will be needed.. if it is going to be a tractor that you just need for small farm work,2 bottom plowing, discing,bush hog, and snow removal, there are more pulling logs, etc,, this tractor will be ok,, given its limited size ,, and horsepower,, it is a good machine,, but being older it will need repairs to it,, if you or someone can do the work, all is well, they are easier than spit to work on,, all the parts are still available and reasonable priced,, , the drawbacks are the HP, the non live pto,, {if you are going to use a bush hog behind it, you should really have a overrunning clutch attachment that goes on the pto shaft,, the tractor does not stop forward momentom with the constantly turning blades}, on a hilly terrain you might want something a little larger,, and with anything these are not toys so the amount of work you can do with them strongly suggests safety,,, where to hook chains and what not, but if you get the tractor you can ask about that,,,
overall, for a small acrage farm, the 9n could work,,, but like what was stated as well, if you are planning on doing any heavy work, baling and such, yo should go bigger,,,, I have 2 N's that do alot of work around here,,, you just need to know when to get bigger,as long as the motor is strong you wont have a lot to worry about,,, these things will run on three cylinders, or even out of whack plug wires, they are still in the field working to day so that has to say something about the vesitility,hope it helped \
pat


Jimbob    Posted 03-19-2003 at 15:29:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
Look for an older model your area supports in parts, etc. Next, defind your use. 30+ drawbar horsepower & live PTO for hay crop is a real plus. Ford tractors are well supported with mail order parts. The Ford 860 series is great, but more expensive over 8N, 9N series.


walt    Posted 03-19-2003 at 14:56:37       [Reply]  [No Email]
If you have to pay someone to work on it, look for something newer.


Pitch    Posted 03-19-2003 at 14:43:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
Depends on what you want a tractor for. I have an 8n which is a '49. An n is not going to do any heavey work but if you just want to brushhog mow plow up to a couple of acres or spread manure it will do the job. The biggest drawback of a tractor that old is lack of a live PTO and hydraulics. That means if you push in the clutch the pto stops and the hydraulics don't work. It just takes some practice to get around it. A machine that old is not gonna be trouble free but the N series is easy to work on and parts are redily available. There is a wealth of knowledge available on www.ytmag.com go to the N series section there. Someone will probably jump on here and tell you what a piece of crap a ford is and push there favorite color on you, but truth be known all these old tractors have limited utility and they are pretty much the same. The big advantage of the fords and fergusons is that they have the three point hitch so you have a wide array of modern implements (cat 1) that can be used with them


Pitch    Posted 03-19-2003 at 14:40:19       [Reply]  [No Email]
Depends on what you want a tractor for. I have an 8n which is a '49. An n is not going to do any heavey work but if you just want to brushhog mow plow up to a couple of acres or spread manure it will do the job. The biggest drawback of a tractor that old is lack of a live PTO and hydraulics. That means if you push in the clutch the pto stops and the hydraulics don't work. It just takes some practice to get around it. A machine that old is not gonna be trouble free but the N series is easy to work on and parts are redily available. There is a wealth of knowledge available on www.ytmag.com go to the N series section there. Someone will probably jump on here and tell you what a piece of crap a ford is and push there favorite color on you, but truth be known all these old tractors have limited utility and they are pretty much the same. The big advantage of the fords and fergusons is that they have the three point hitch so you have a wide array of modern implements (cat 1) that can be used with them


Ludwig    Posted 03-20-2003 at 07:28:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
I thought the N tractors had live PTO and hydralics? Maybe the 2n? I suggested to one of my friends to get one because of the live hydralics. Maybe I can switch back to suggesting a Super A again.


pat    Posted 03-20-2003 at 10:00:01       [Reply]  [No Email]
no the N's dont have live pto,, the 8n has draft control which the 9-2n do not have , I think maybe the live pto started with the workmaster and the 1oo series,, tractors,,may be wrong on the models with the live pto , but not on the n's


{Ihope,,haha}
pat


pat    Posted 03-20-2003 at 09:59:20       [Reply]  [No Email]
no the N's dont have live pto,, the 8n has draft control which the 9-2n do not have , I think maybe the live pto started with the workmaster and the 1oo series,, tractors,,may be wrong on the models with the live pto , but not on the n's


{Ihope,,haha}
pat


Ludwig    Posted 03-20-2003 at 13:21:05       [Reply]  [No Email]
Huh, learn something new every day.


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community