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Country Discussion Topics
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Why does meat have to hang and for how long?
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Harry    Posted 03-19-2003 at 16:48:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
Just wondering? Waht if you don't and what temp is best?


Corey    Posted 03-20-2003 at 07:21:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
We hang beef for 7 to 10 days in controled envirenment, hogs you don't hang for prolonged periods of time, just a day or so to chill the meat. We don't hang deer either, instead we quarter it up, put it in ice chest put ice over it and as the ice melts it leaches out the blood, pour off the water and repeat once daily for 3 days, this gets most all the blood out of the meat and gets rid of the wild taste, also tenderises it.


p shorten    Posted 10-19-2005 at 13:28:50       [Reply]  [Send Email]
we are having an argument with our son how long can you hang a phesant in summer and winter many thanks paul


victoria houghton    Posted 05-27-2007 at 09:35:18       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I've just bought a beef rib from a market butcher who said it's been hanging for 21 days. I cooked and ate it with my family because I thought this was the max time for hanging beef. Is this normal?


DeadCarp    Posted 03-20-2003 at 05:44:36       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yup, makes it more tender. A note of caution for any would-be nature gourmets out there - years ago, our neighbor gal Nancy was going to law school and we were cutting up a poached deer in the kitchen when she stopped in. We planned to just make all jerky to save it cuz it was summer. Fascinated by the whole process, she helped and sipped some wine and was pretty soon nibbling a few tiny morsels as they were harvested. as-is, and she adored it. I guess she ate a bit too much and it apparently cleaned her out, cuz she couldn't get off the pot or back to school for a few days. (She's a lawyer in Oregon now so it turned out okay) But put a little thought into your snacks :)


Ludwig    Posted 03-20-2003 at 07:26:06       [Reply]  [No Email]
EWWW!!!
One of my friends gets alot of the roadkill deer and I used to go over and help cut up. We usually throw the small pieces into a bowl and his wife would come out occasionally and throw the bowl into a skillet and fry it up for snacks while we're cutting.
One time the "snack pieces" were unusually good, of course it was a very young deer. I commented on it just as the guy who hit the deer walked in, he was quick to jump in "Of course it tastes good, I hit it with a brand new BMW!"


TimV    Posted 03-19-2003 at 17:57:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
Harry:
Hanging meat breaks down the connective tissue, resulting in a more tender finished product. Hanging time is largely a matter of preference--a friend of mine with a custom butcher shop usually figures on 5-7 days at 35-40 F for beef or venison. However, you can go shorter or longer--I've seen 2-3 weeks provided the meat is in a temperature-controlled environment such as a meat locker. On the other hand, when we do our yearly butchering (beef) on the farm, we seldom let the meat hang more than a day or two, as we don't have the facilities to safely hang meat longer than that.


TimV    Posted 03-19-2003 at 17:55:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
Harry:
Hanging meat breaks down the connective tissue, resulting in a more tender finished product. Hanging time is largely a matter of preference--a friend of mine with a custom butcher shop usually figures on 5-7 days at 35-40 F for beef or venison. However, you can go shorter or longer--I've seen 2-3 weeks provided the meat is in a temperature-controlled environment such as a meat locker. On the other hand, when we do our yearly butchering (beef) on the farm, we seldom let the meat hang more than a day or two, as we don't have the facilities to safely hang meat longer than that.


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