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Country Discussion Topics
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Pressure tank
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Mitch    Posted 07-29-2001 at 00:12:38       [Reply]  [Send Email]
My submersiboe pump continually goes on and off. I have a tall round Pumpco pressure tank with a screw in the very top. Thinking the well is water-logged, I removed the screw and drained a lot of water out of the system, then reinserted the screw and turned the pump back on. Didn;tmake any improvement. I am thinking of buying a new tank with a bladder in it, only I have never installed one before. Anyone have any suggestions? I can't seem to find a "well=person" in this area where I have only lived a short time. Thanks.


Alvin    Posted 07-29-2001 at 18:02:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
If you got a submersible pump, you should have a sniffer valve to leave air into the water pipe so when the pump stops the water can drain back into the well, because there should be a small hole drilled into the water pipe that is in the casing.Also between the sniffer valve and water tank there should be a check valve to to keep the water you just pumped into the tank from siphoning back into the well.I have a pressure tank that is since 1945 and doesn't leak.If the pump keeps start and stop, the check valve is probably stuck open and should be replaced.


OW    Posted 07-29-2001 at 03:22:02       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yeah, those pressure tanks without bladders will absorb bubbles from the water, and every so often they need to be drained almost empty again, or they'll keep starting the pump in spurts.

Either that, or you have a steady leak somewhere ..... don't wait til you start to spend $200/month to heat water and start to smell mildew before you look for it. like I did! heh heh


Alvin-Va    Posted 07-29-2001 at 18:13:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Mitch,may I add one suggestion to what OW said,check for a down-stream leak before replacing anything.Find the first cut-off BEYOND the tank,cut it off and see if it stops the problem.If the pump doesn't stop running,listen to the other posts.If this cures the pump problem,find the leak.Hopefully the cut-off will be close enought to the tank that you can eliminate this section as a problem.


IHank    Posted 07-29-2001 at 01:57:55       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Mitch- It's easy. Buy as large a tank as you can afford and will fit the space. Feed it from a tee fitting, with the pump coming from one side and the usage on the other and the tank above. Set it up on some concrete blocks.

The air pressure in the bladder should be a little more than half of what the pump cut off pressure is. Now, getting the two pressures adjusted will take some patience and you need to get the tank empty of water before adjusting air pressure in the bladder thing.

Once you get it right the pump should kick in, fill the tank nearly all the way, then shut off. As you use water it will come from the pressure tank. When the tank gets low the pump should kick in and re-fill.

The purpose of the tank is to prevent the constant on/off cycling of the pump. Hope this telling helps. IHank


Mike in Nc    Posted 07-29-2001 at 17:06:27       [Reply]  [No Email]
They are easy to install- most come with directions on how to install- you can use a bicycle tire pump to pressurize the tank bladder if that is all you have and need to add pressure. They will definately lengthen the life of your pump. If you plan on staying there for a while I recommend a tank with a long warranty period- I believe Lowes sells one with a life time warranty . Other wise you will need to replace the tank every 7-10 years.


walter    Posted 02-19-2004 at 19:26:02       [Reply]  [Send Email]
can u give me a detailed and illustrated instruction on how to install a jet pump to pressure tank to house water line.

thank you


Tom    Posted 03-11-2002 at 08:52:38       [Reply]  [Send Email]
regarding using a bike tire pump to put some air in the bladder of a pressure tank, where do you pump the air in? Our pump is cycling off and on again too often, and putting air into the tank helped once before but we didn't watch how the guy did it. Thanks.


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