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Country Discussion Topics
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Anyboby out there know of a spray to put on your Gumball Trees to Keep them from setting Gumball- Hurt My Bare Feet!!
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Ouch in Illinois    Posted 04-07-2003 at 18:41:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
If anybody has heard of the substance or where I can get it just respond to this message- Thanks BOB


Mike    Posted 12-10-2003 at 08:18:54       [Reply]  [Send Email]
There is a way to prevent sweet gum balls from forming. A contact growth regulator called Florel, which contains the chemical ethephon, can be sprayed on the tree. The ideal time to spray is the mid to full bloom stage right after the tiny balls form from below the catkin. After application, the balls simply dry up and fall off.

Florel should be mixed three ounces per gallon of water or one quart per ten gallons of water. An average size tree will take 10-20 gallons of spray. The same chemical can be used to cause blossom drop on apple and crabapple trees, plus several other trees.

Contrary to some who believe the only way to cure the production of these seeds is a cut at ground level with a chainsaw, spraying with this product will give you some relief and prevent the formation of many of the sweet gum ball seeds. You can either spray yourself or hire a commercial sprayer. Hose end sprayers will usually spray 30-40 feet. Don't try it with a two-gallon sprayer on a ladder. It's not worth it.



Ron    Posted 06-10-2005 at 06:20:36       [Reply]  [Send Email]
has anyone tried using Florel to keep a honey locus tree from producing bean like pods? Although there are podless varieties, we had the type that produces hundreds if not thousands of pods each year, some years worse than others... the only other alternative is to cut down the tree, which we prefer not to do....thanks,

Ron


there's a way - williamf    Posted 04-08-2003 at 06:29:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
But it may not be practical for you.


try again with the link    Posted 04-08-2003 at 06:31:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
If the linker doesn't work for mr this time, Copy and Paste this:
www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/macon/inout/010311.html


cindy    Posted 05-10-2005 at 09:30:36       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I do not know of a spray, but my husband is on his way to the hardware store to buy a large spike, we were told to drive the spike in the base of the tree and it would quit producing the gum balls.


bob    Posted 04-08-2003 at 07:17:55       [Reply]  [No Email]
thanks I'll get some floral and try it.


mojo    Posted 04-07-2003 at 23:42:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
produce or hire kids to pick them up?

mulch all the way around and avoid the place?

wear shoes?

*nothing will stop a plant from reproducing short of death*

trees don't know about trojans.


buck    Posted 04-07-2003 at 18:47:34       [Reply]  [No Email]

A little 50 to 1 and some bar oil is the best thing I know of.


Bob    Posted 04-07-2003 at 19:46:02       [Reply]  [No Email]
Ok, other than cutting it down.


George    Posted 12-21-2007 at 15:07:23       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Not sure where you live, but the Honey Locus tree is a favorite of
deer when winter feeding becomes difficult. It's sort of a last
resort meal for them after the corn and other crops have been
harvested.

Bring in a bunch of hungry does and in a few years, they'll eat
them up for you. : P


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