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Country Discussion Topics
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Wild berry bushes
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QH Mom    Posted 04-09-2003 at 13:37:20       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Nice site,just found it,spend a lot of time browsing.
I am new to rural living and will admit my total ignorance of how to clear brush.
Seems a lot of experience here-anyone know an easier way to do away with these monsters than just pruning and digging up?
Thanks


Salmoneye    Posted 04-10-2003 at 02:46:59       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Brush-hog em and then keep it hogged 2-3 times a year...


Randy    Posted 04-09-2003 at 16:26:48       [Reply]  [Send Email]
First of all, welcome.
Could mow them with a heavy duty mower. I found that if you have to cut them do so in small pieces. That way they are easier to handle and don't whip around and grab you again and again. Once down easy to mow or clip once in a while. Wear gloves!
Keep asking questions, I'm sure we'll ask some that you can help with too.


Terry Bell    Posted 07-23-2003 at 16:53:02       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We manage an apartment complex on the oregon coast and it is amazing how fast our black berry bushes grow. The complex is on 7 acres of wooded property with fields surrounding it. We let them grow during the spring and summer as the residents love picking them and making pies, jellies or just eating them.
After the picking season is over it's all out war on them. We use shipping pallets and throw them into the bushes, stand on them to knock them down. Then we use limb loppers to nip them off at the ground and then move them over.
We also use the pallets to make pathes in the clumps of bushes after they ripen and as they are picked. It makes a nice size path and is easy to stand on to knock them down with.
Our goal isn't to completely rid our complex of all the bushes. We use them as fence rows around our property to control elk, deer and people wondering around it after dark. Works great and is all natural. It also doesn't cost anything to built, repair or paint becuase of all our wettenss and salt air. AND,,,they taste great.



williamf    Posted 04-09-2003 at 15:26:25       [Reply]  [Send Email]
What kind of berries? If you want to get rid of them I would guess they're briars, but I'm guessing.


QH Mom    Posted 04-09-2003 at 20:36:54       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I believe they are wild blackberries-they are tasty when ripe but they are a literal pain to live around.
Was hoping there was a better way than just ripping or mowing. We have a tiny place..only 4 acres but have almost all of it covered in these things.
Well the land was empty for 9 years-maybe in another 9 we can get the place back from the vines.
Goats are not an option...hubby says one more animal and he goes :O)

Thanks guys


Blackberrys,    Posted 04-10-2003 at 19:52:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
BEFOR You mow spray with herbicide! And wait. Mowing will encourage growth.....


Ol' Phart    Posted 04-12-2003 at 18:31:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi! I am QH Mom's Hubby! We have horses and worry about pesticides & herbicides with the mares and foals. Do you have a suggestion for pasture/grazing safe herbicide?


TB    Posted 04-10-2003 at 04:20:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
With animals being out that leaves machinery a nice tractor with a brush hog will do the trick. Once you get them mowed off regular mowing should keep them under controll.


Loyd Jensen    Posted 08-14-2003 at 12:50:26       [Reply]  [Send Email]
My mother use to make a jell when I was young. I thought it was eldeberry. Then I looked at a site for eldeberry but it was not what I remembered. So I started to watch the ditches on my travels. I seen the bush type that we picked from. It has several bunches of small purple berries in a group. the berries are smaller than a pea. Usually anywhere from 10 to 50 in a bunch.
If you can help me identify this bush I would really appreciate it. Thanks


Tom A    Posted 04-10-2003 at 04:02:18       [Reply]  [Send Email]
First off, welcome!

We bought our place almost 5 years ago now, 19 acres. All had been "let go" for at least several years, some of it much longer. It was almost totally covered with briars, honeysuckle, and wild rose. I've now got about 12 or 15 acres fairly well cleared, and maybe 6 or 8 of that is in very nice shape that I cut decent hay off of.

If your 4 acres are uniformly bad, I'd say first and probably easiest "quick fix" is to bush hog the place to get the biggest brush down. The more often, and closer, you mow it after that the faster and better the stuff that grows back will be. I switched from a bush hog to a sicklebar mower after awhile because it cuts closer and I needed it for hay anyway.

The briars will die off after about a year of being mowed too close, and the grass will prosper on fallow land. A small old (cheap) tractor will pull a 5' bushhog and you can do your 4 acres in a few hours...cut it a couple of times a year at least (again, more often is better).

A trick I was taught along old fenceline, especially cutting for the first time in many years: I use a long (35' - 50') rope along with my tractor. I tie one end of the rope to the drawbar, thread the other end along the fenceline to gather as much of the thorny stuff I can and then loop it back and tie it to the drawbar. When I drive the tractor forward, it draws the stuff together into a tight bunch that I can cut with a single wack of the chainsaw, then I drag it to the burn pile. It is a little faster and easier on the hands and clothes than cutting individual briars.

Tell your hubby that goats and sheep (a couple of each) are really a good way to do it. I can look out over my place and the pastureland where mine are is much, much nicer and greener than the fields that I mow. They're also good friends and pets if you pay attention to them--as good as a dog. Otherwise, mowing is a permanent piece of your life unless you pay somebody else to do it.

Once/if you get your grass growing fairly well, you can let a neighbor cut hay off of the land...costs you nothing and saves you time. That is what I did for the first year.

good luck,
Tom


DeadCarp    Posted 04-09-2003 at 23:03:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
Shoot! If goats are out, i imagine a few rabbits are beyond suggestion. ALTHOUGH you'd be tickled at how well they ring the bark on brush and kill it. My aunt cleared their place in 3 years and had free meat anytime she got bored with beef. :)


Susan Lee    Posted 01-20-2004 at 16:12:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi,
I'm not sure how you spell the name of this berry, but it sounds like La La Berry. I think it's a cross between a boysenberry and another type of berry. Do you know anything about this type of berry?
Thank you very much for your response.
Susan


QH Mom    Posted 04-09-2003 at 20:27:35       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I believe they are wild blackberries-they are tasty when ripe but they are a literal pain to live around.
Was hoping there was a better way than just ripping or mowing. We have a tiny place..only 4 acres but have almost all of it covered in these things.
Well the land was empty for 9 years-maybe in another 9 we can get the place back from the vines.
Goats are not an option...hubby says one more animal and he goes :O)

Thanks guys


TB    Posted 04-09-2003 at 17:13:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
I think sheep and/or goats love briars


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