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Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Will a crimper help? If it will, how much?
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Tom a    Posted 04-22-2003 at 05:57:43       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi All, got a hay implement question for you.

I've got one lowland field that I've tried haying off of for several years, but usually without any success. Rarely can I get the hay to dry enough to get it to keep without molding...even in the dead of summer, it just won't quite get dry enough. Seems like it is dry, but then the mold just appears. I don't have the problem with my other hayfields. But even in the worst drought in decades, the grass grows well in this field so I'd really like to get it dried.

I mow with a sicklebar mower, and now put the hay up loose, although I'd like to bale again eventually.

There's a crimper for sale at an auction this week. Is it worth me buying a crimper? How much of a difference will it make in the hay drying? I really don't want to spend lots of money on implements I don't need (haybine is out of the question) for my little place, but if it'll help and it goes cheap I'd like to get it.

thanks,
Tom A


Burrhead    Posted 04-22-2003 at 15:33:12       [Reply]  [No Email]
Tom since you mentioned having a small operation here's a money saver. You can cut the left side skirting off a bushhog if you already have one and it does better than any hay crimper you can buy.

I did'nt believe it when a friend told me about it when my conditioner died but after years of use it still makes better grass hay than any conditioner on the market.

If you have alfalfa it wont work cause it shatters too much of the leaves away but in grass it can't be beat.


Mike    Posted 06-19-2004 at 16:19:15       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I just stumbled on this site and your suggestion to use a brush hog w/ the side cut off as a crimper. I had a question .... would you still use a sickle bar to cut first and then run the modified brush hog or actually cut w/ the brush hog? This sounds like it would be great for me to try. I have about 4 acers and I am just using a sickle bar mower and a rake. I live in western NY and it seams impossible to get enough sunny days in a row to dry the hay w/o conditioning it. I just stumbled on this site and your suggestion to use a brush hog w/ the side cut off as a crimper. I had a question .... would you still use a sickle bar to cut first and then run the modified brush hog or actually cut w/ the brush hog? This sounds like it would be great for me to try. I have about 4 acres and I am just using a sickle bar mower and a rake. I live in western NY and it seams impossible to get enough sunny days in a row to dry the hay w/o conditioning it. Any more info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Mike


Tom A    Posted 04-23-2003 at 04:14:15       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi Burrhead, thanks, that's the second time I've heard that. My next-door neighbor suggested the same thing for haying on my really steep hills. Before we got the goats I used to bush hog them anyway. But now they harvest that for me.

I didn't really consider it for this wet field, but that's a thought if I don't get the crimper. I'll keep my eye out for a cheap bushog to do it with...I use my other one too much for hogging to cut it up.

Tom


Mike D.    Posted 04-23-2003 at 06:05:55       [Reply]  [No Email]
Tom,
My friend has an old Bushog brand mower that he cut the side off of. He has welded hinges on to the side panel. He dogs it up with a rubber strap when he mows he lowland. Lot less drag on the tractor when in that hole.


ya know, that's what I love about this place....    Posted 04-23-2003 at 09:57:57       [Reply]  [No Email]
There's more great ideas floating around here than I don't know what! Mike, the hinges are another great idea I will take advantage of...can do double duty with my hog.

thanks,
Tom


rhudson    Posted 04-22-2003 at 15:05:37       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I'm with Duke on this. the crimper will only help if your hay is stalkie, it will not help much with leafey stuff. you need loft to get it off the ground and into the air. i've been told the tedder is the way to go.


Duke Black    Posted 04-22-2003 at 07:20:56       [Reply]  [No Email]
If it goes cheap buy it. A good crimper with steel rollers will fit that hay faster than a hay bind. Sounds like you need a hay tedder to fluff that hay, and get it up off the ground some.
In the 60s we cut and crimped in the morning. The next day rake just before noon if dew wasn't to heavy. Then bale in the afternoon. I can't do this with a haybind, takes alittle longer for hay to dry.
Have you tryed raking it twice to roll it over?
I don't like to rake twice, but sometimes you have no choice if the ground is wet. Thats where those hay tedders shine by fluffing and lifting so air can get under the crop.
The crimper dose fluff it up more than the mower. Should help, but get some ear protection there very loud.

Duke


Red Dave    Posted 04-22-2003 at 06:49:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
Get a crimper if you can. I don't know whether it'll do much on grass, but it can't hurt and anything with a stalk will get broken open by the rollers so it can dry.
Not much demand for crimpers around here. Everybody wants a Haybine. Couple years ago, I bought a McCormick Model 2A hay conditioner (crimper) at an auction for $5. Worked fine, only needed tires. I only bought it to keep it from being cut up for scrap.


ha ha    Posted 04-22-2003 at 07:08:06       [Reply]  [No Email]
if it goes for $5, or $25, I don't have a question, I'll buy it!

But I'm worried about worst case...there are a fair number of real small-time folks like me here, and the smaller, older equipment sometimes goes for fairly big money. I have to decide now how much this'll be worth to me before I start bidding. I watched an old dump rake go to a couple of yuppies for a yard ornament for around $500 as I recall...I quit bidding around $100.
Not sure anybody'd want a crimper, but I want to "wargame it" before hand.

thanks,
Tom A


Old Sarge    Posted 04-22-2003 at 06:09:54       [Reply]  [Send Email]
IMHO, I would go for it. I've done up many 1,000's of bales. Mostly Alfalfa, but I could mow this AM and bale on Thursday. 48 hours was all it took with a crimper . Course it was a haybine and a Self propelled baler.

You could always do custom work with it.


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