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Country Discussion Topics
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Post Puller
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Chuck in Kansas    Posted 05-01-2003 at 14:39:09       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Will someone describe a tool that I can build to pull T-Posts. I need to pull about two hundred T-Posts and there has got to be an easy way to do this.
Thanks


screaminghollow    Posted 05-02-2003 at 07:12:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
Buying the $15.00 job from a farm/hardware supplier is easiest and most cost effective. Building something that will last takes moderate time and materials. My buddy uses chain and a 1960's bumper jack. Handling the jack, base/ handle, and chain, is too many pieces. Unless you have access to machinery, it would be a major undertaking to cut the steel plate for the part that slips over the t-post. I use my commercially made t-post puller every couple weeks, it doesn't come apart, it's easier and less time consuming than my buddy's system. A contractor friend uses a piece of steel plate that looks like an over sized luggage tag attached to a piece of chain. The rectangular hole slips over the t-post and then tilted to grab one of the nubs on the face of the post. the chain is attached to the bucket of his front end loader. It pulls them out great, but I can do it with my little $20.00 job faster and don't need to worry about maneuvering a frontend loader.


Cathy in Oregon    Posted 05-01-2003 at 21:07:10       [Reply]  [Send Email]
For years my folks used the jack method. Then one day a friend of mine's son was taking welding at highschool. He made us one that just pops them out of the ground. . I don't know how we got ever got along with out it.
I am the type of person that if I can get away with not buying something, I will not buy it. (can we say tightwad?) I would highly recommend buying one of these pullers.. or making one. They are really worth it. Especially if you are pulling 200 posts!!! I like it coz it is real light and I can take it easily with me. Using the jack was a pain because it was way too heavy for me (and I am strong for a woman).


Linda    Posted 05-01-2003 at 21:05:35       [Reply]  [No Email]
Cody Mercantile out of Cody, Wyoming, has the best catalog for that kind of stuff. The catalog is called "Modern Farm" & we've been getting it for years. I've bought my husband some of his favorite tools from these folks. Their service & delivery is prompt, too. I would suggest contacting them to request a catalog, as I don't see a lot of the items they carry on their website.

My husband used to use his handyman jack and a chain to pull posts and that worked just fine. Then, I bought him a rectangular piece of steel that slips over a T post for pulling. Much, much easier than using chain. He keeps that gadget firmly clipped to his handyman jack at all times.


JoeK    Posted 05-01-2003 at 20:09:49       [Reply]  [No Email]
On the farm we used to have one made from a water pump handle.See "post puller"in photo gallery for rough sketch.I think someone in neighborhood made them.I remember the neighbors had one similar,but base plate was disk blade,also same setup on angle iron "A"frame stand.The pull "plate" wedges on the post when pressure is applied.Square hole plate was also around the shed for"U"posts.Any questions post back,and I'll wake up another brain cell or two. Oh,standard was about 4-5'high overall,pivot point about a foot down.


buck    Posted 05-01-2003 at 18:34:21       [Reply]  [No Email]

A while back someome made a post here (I think) about using a short piece of metal pipe or flat steel to do the trick. Just push the post away and hold the pipe on the ground and in one of the notches on the post and pull back. This creates a jacking action and out comes the post. I have not tried it but it sounded like a neat and simple idea.


buck    Posted 05-01-2003 at 18:23:30       [Reply]  [No Email]

A while back someome made a post here (I think) about using a short piece of metal pipe or flat steel to do the trick. Just push the post away and hold the pipe on the ground and in one of the notches on the post and pull back. This creates a jacking action and out comes the post. I have not tried it but it sounded like a neat and simple idea.


Jim in Michigan    Posted 05-01-2003 at 17:13:43       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Do you have a tractor? Or a 4x4 truck,,I use my truck or tractor,,I take a old car rim minus the tire, place it standing up like it would be mounted on the car, then hook a chain around the post at the bottom, then run the chain over the wheel and to whatever I am pulling with,, the wheel works like a pulley and makes upward force on the post, I have never bent a post yet, I also use the snow plow lift on my truck if I dont feel like messing with the wheel method, Snow plow lift pops the posts right out. Try using a wheel though,,its simple and free most everyone has a old wheel layin around,,e mail me if ya need more info on how to use it,Jim


Hal/WA    Posted 05-01-2003 at 16:38:09       [Reply]  [No Email]
I bought one at Harbor Freight on sale for about $15. It is more or less a lever on a collumn fulcrum standing on a base with a short length of steel with an opening in it to grab the T post hinge mounted on the short side of the lever. It has pulled every T post I have tried it on and does not bend them up. I doubt that I could have built one much cheaper than the $15 cost, but maybe someone else could if they had the right steel sitting around. You might want to take a look at Harbor Freight to either buy their puller or get the idea of how they built it. Maybe you could improve the design. Good luck.


Robert    Posted 05-01-2003 at 15:21:26       [Reply]  [No Email]
I like to use the 3 point hitch on my tractor for this job best, but a handy-man-jack works well too. I guess a car bumper jack probably would work as well?
Robert


Fawteen    Posted 05-01-2003 at 15:15:44       [Reply]  [No Email]
Check the link


Okie-Dokie    Posted 05-01-2003 at 18:34:26       [Reply]  [No Email]
You must have learned that trick of using a chain, a wheel, and your pick-up here in Okla. It's true, poor folks have poor ways, but sometime poor ways work best. Seems to me that a small diameter chain works better than an old log chain.


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