Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Seeking Pole Barn advice
[Return to Topics]

Lynn Kasdorf- Leesburg, VA    Posted 05-02-2003 at 12:50:06       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I'm trying to strategize on building a pole barn to store tractors and such in. I'm also considering walling off and insulating a section as a "clean" shop area for my electronics lab.

Our land is on a river, and technically in the 100 year flood plain. The site where I plan to build drains reasonably well, but I am planning of bringing in a bunch of large gravel to build the area up, after I get the poles in place. I figure it would be best to drive up into the barn.

I am considering pouring a floating slab in part or all of the barn. I can get a cement truck in for that, or I am considering doing it myself, as I recently acquired a cement mixer. I need to cost it out to see how much of a savings there would be. If I end up with a slab, I may move my metal working machines here, in order to get them out of my wood shop.

Another variable: I recently acquired a Mobile Dimension sawmill! This will cut a dimensioned board from a tree in one pass. I don't really need a sawmill, but I got it for a song at an estate sale. I may decide to sell it after I use it a while and see how much work it is moving logs!

So the obvious thing here is to mill my own lumber. The problem is getting trees, and moving them around.

I have a 1957 Ford 650 tractor with a boom pole. I also have, but have not tried to mount or use, an old Wagner tube front loader for this tractor. I also have a post hole digger, with a 10 or 12 inch auger (which is not really large enough, i know- but the holes can be widened).

More questions- how to set the poles. I wonder if the loader would be up to the task of pulling them vertical? I figure 6x6 pt pine, as i can no longer get utility poles.

I need to determine what the tallest pole is that I'll be able to handle, and weight that into my design. There are several large trees nearby- I thought about climbing up them and attaching block & tackles to assist in setting the poles.

Once poles are figured out, the next issue is trusses, or stick built roof? Or timber frame?

I think trusses are pretty much out of the question unless I get a company to come in with a crane and lift them into position. Also, they waste space in the attic.

I'm thinking that maybe I could hire a company to dig holes and set poles and I do the rest. I've not found such a company yet, though. They all wnat to sell me a completed building for $9k.

I should be able to mill up boards for siding, if nothing else. There are a couple dead poplars on my property, and they apparently do well for siding, as long as they dont stay wet.

Lotsa variables here...any advice welcome.


Dan G/Soganofla    Posted 05-06-2003 at 07:51:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hi, Lynn. There is no reason you couldn't cut all the material you need with your MD mill. You might find someone who needs some milling done, and do the cutting on shares. That way, you would get all the lumber you need, just for the effort of pulling that little handle for a while. You also might locate a company that will pressure treat your lumber for you. These places are getting harder to find, but they're still around.

I have a 1986 MD model 128 sawmill that I plan to make my living with, in the near future. It is a fine machine. Once you use your's for a while, you may not want to get rid of it. :-)>>>


Lynn Kasdorf    Posted 05-03-2003 at 18:05:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
What is wrong with pressure treated pine poles? As far as I know, all pressure treated lumber is pine.

I would not consider any sort of pole other than commercial pressure treated, although I do like the idea of embedding angle iron and bolting it to posts.

The only way I could consider pouring cement myself would be to do it in sections. But a nice continuous slab is nicer.


Lynn Kasdorf    Posted 05-03-2003 at 18:05:27       [Reply]  [Send Email]
What is wrong with pressure treated pine poles? As far as I know, all pressure treated lumber is pine.

I would not consider any sort of pole other than commercial pressure treated, although I do like the idea of embedding angle iron and bolting it to posts.

The only way I could consider pouring cement myself would be to do it in sections. But a nice continuous slab is nicer.


Robert    Posted 05-03-2003 at 09:24:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
I've built several pole buildings, and i also have a saw mill to saw a lot of my own lumber.

I think it would be a BIG mistake to try to use your own posts, especially pine!!! Buy treated post with .60 retention and consider it $$ well spent!!!

Popular will make good sideing, but like you said, you have to keep it dry. It does take and hold paint well. White oak would be a better choise though!!!

I also have a cement mixer. Mine goes on my tractor 3 point hitch, so i can back to were i want the cement and easily dump it. I don't think you have any idea how much work it is to mix and pour a whole barn floor!! And unless you pour untill your whole floor is done i don't think you'll have as nice a job as one whole pour either. I'd have the cement brought in, as it will still be more work than you want!!!

Spend a little more now, and enjoy a nice building the rest of your life!
Robert


DeadCarp    Posted 05-02-2003 at 19:11:57       [Reply]  [No Email]
Coupla thoughts - first off, an old utility pole will probably last about 10 years plus. Nothing you cut will last more than maybe 4, and rot's a shame to see when it happens. If you treat the posts right, maybe get 6-7 years out of them. Pay particular attention to them right where they meet the ground, that's where the bugs live.
Yep, we built a log cabin from green poplar in 1980 and it's still standing though the norways underneath are history. Again, treat them.
I hope your metal working equipment isn't real heavy - some tools almost need their own foundations just to stabilize them.
Up here in Mn they let you build a house 3 feet above the 100-year high-water mark, so that's a sorta guideline. If it needs backfill, i'd put a footing/block stubwall, fill that & pour over it.
If prices run like they used to, aything more than a cubic yard is cheaper with redi-mix. And a lot easier on your back. :)



jiMP    Posted 05-02-2003 at 15:25:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
wHEN i BUILT MY BARN, i USED 6X6 ANGLE IRON AND PUT 4' DOWN IN CEMENT AND 4' UP TO BOLT THE 6X6 POLES INTO. Use 1/2 " boltes with washers, 3 per angle side. The timber won't rot, the tie in is very strong and when you get the siding on. it wil be even stronger. Old used angle iron is cheap and will be there forever. Use your 12" digger and pour your own concrete in the holes. The timber wont have to be over 12' if you tie them in this way. The boom would be perfect.
You can then form and pour the floor as a monolithic slab.


Keewaydin    Posted 05-02-2003 at 14:00:34       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Just a few quick thoughts as I'm in a hurry right now. Maybe more later.
We have two pole barns built as lean-tos on each side of our big frame barn. Both used as machinery storage now. The one on the south was used for cattle feeding during the winter. If you want it to last use pressure treated poles. A 12" auger is plenty big but they should go down below frost line. Probably not as much of a problem where you are as it is here in Maine. We put a
pad of concrete about 6" thick in the bottom of each hole to get a broader base. Pole barn spikes (almost like a screw) work the best. I should think a boom would be perfect for setting them. They need to be braced to stakes until enough is built to hold them. Pretty rocky gravel tamped into the holes worked best for us. Around here we never saw poplar into boards, rots too easily. I wouldn't put pine where it gets ground contact but I guess your pine is different than our White Pine. We did all the work ourselves and didn't put much money into it. Poured a concrete floor in one of them with our little mixer but dug out and put quite a bit of rough gravel in first. Hosed it and ran a 8N Ford back and forth to compact it before we ran the cement. I don't think we have the water problem that you do.
Lots of luck


Keewaydin    Posted 05-02-2003 at 13:57:54       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Just a few quick thoughts as I'm in a hurry right now. Maybe more later.
We have two pole barns built as lean-tos on each side of our big frame barn. Both used as machinery storage now. The one on the south was used for cattle feeding during the winter. If you want it to last use pressure treated poles. A 12" auger is plenty big but they should go down below frost line. Probably not as much of a problem where you are as it is here in Maine. We put a pad of concrete about 6" thick in the bottom of each hole to get a broader base. Pole barn spikes (almost like a screw) work the best. I should think a boom would be perfect for setting them. They need to be braced to stakes until enough is built to hold them. Pretty rocky gravel tamped into the holes worked best for us. Around here we never saw poplar into boards, rots too easily. I wouldn't put pine where it gets ground contact but I guess your pine is different than our White Pine. We did all the work ourselves and didn't put much money into it. Poured a concrete floor in one of them with out little mixer but dug out and put quite a bit of rough gravel in first. Hosed it and ran a 8N Ford back and forth to compact it before we ran the cement. I don't think we have the water problem that you do.
Lots of luck


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community