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Country Discussion Topics
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Who knows about apple trees?
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NH SIDEHILLER    Posted 08-02-2001 at 18:39:15       [Reply]  [Send Email]
What time of the year do apple trees decide what they're going to do the following year? In relation to blossoming, I mean.


Salmoneye    Posted 08-03-2001 at 03:08:04       [Reply]  [Send Email]
If you are asking what you can do to promote blossoming and the setting of fruit, then you need to prune.
Around here the orchards prune in the dead of winter in February.
And don't think you will hurt the tree.
Prune the heck out of the things and they seem to love it.
There are sites all over the net about pruning.
I will post again if I get the time to look for the ones that I have seen...


NH SIDEHILLER    Posted 08-03-2001 at 07:59:46       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks for the helpful links, Salmoneye. I know just enough about pruning to be dangerous! I have about 40-50 trees which I have grafted over the past 14 years. I prune them every year while dormant to make them more productive and keep them so that I can pick the fruit from the ground. This year's crop is so-so. Last year was a disaster. It was so cold during blossoming that there were no pollenators active. No one around here keeps bees anymore. My neighbor had a hive brought in during blossoming a few years ago and a bear destroyed it the first night. We're overrun with "welfare" bears around here. I expect you are, too in your neck of the woods.
My question was really as I asked it originally. When do the trees decide how much they're going to blossom in the spring? If I prune in the winter, does the tree say to itself, "Aha, now I can really put out some blossoms" or has that decision already been made earlier?
It's just a matter of curiosity more than anything. Thanks.


Salmoneye    Posted 08-03-2001 at 10:29:22       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Then I do believe it is as you stated, that the tree 'sees' that it only has so many branches after pruning and that it can concntrate all its' stored energy in the blossoms.
I think that you have hit it right!
If you are getting plenty of flowers but few apples then it is a polination problem.
I have no such trouble here as I have sat and counted at least 10 different types of bees at one time on my trees.
Even if there were no honey bees here I would not be worried...


Debra Ball    Posted 02-13-2006 at 15:58:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Question - I was given a Malus x domestica Yellow delicious apple tree. I am trying to find out if it self pollinates or if I need another tree. Do you know or where would I go to find out?


TomH    Posted 08-03-2001 at 16:18:22       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Apple trees bear on "spurs", take a look at the branches in the winter, they look like big but kind of dull thorns. Apple trees tend to have a light crop the year after they have a heavy one, could be the trees need some fertilizer to perk them up.


Salmoneye-Links Here...    Posted 08-03-2001 at 03:16:41       [Reply]  [No Email]
Pruning Neglected Apple Trees

Types Of Pruning

More On Pruning

And there is a whole whack more info out there...


fred gumkoeski    Posted 05-30-2002 at 17:04:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
ineed information on when to spray apple trees and what to spray them with. i live in alna maine and have approximately 19 older apple trees that have been neglected.


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