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Country Discussion Topics
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will cows eat briar bushes?
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ret    Posted 05-15-2003 at 16:21:44       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Daughter's place has a lot of empty paddocks, wild berry bushes taking over along the fences. Would a young beef keep them thinned out, or do I have to spend a fortune on vegetation killer? All the fences are three board horse fencing. If not, what will chew them up?
thanks
REt


screaminghollow    Posted 05-16-2003 at 06:30:15       [Reply]  [No Email]
Goats are a royal pain to confine, but do a great job thinning out the briars, multi rose etc. Sheep are easier to confine, but less aggressive on the throny stuff. Cattle and horses will pick leaves off most briars but won't tackle the twigs. Alot of folk around here keep a donkey in with the sheep or goats. Heard they will eat the briars too. I've seen my cattle munching on young multiflora rose shoots and leaves, but they don't eat them back like goats will. We use goats to clear out our old pastures. When the poplar and maple saplings are in full leaf, we cut them off and the goats even strip the bark off the branches. We've cleared about eight acres with the goats and they do fine. With the brush killed back and the grass kept cropped by the sheep and cattle, we don't have as many ticks and mosquitos either.


rhudson    Posted 05-16-2003 at 06:18:19       [Reply]  [Send Email]
no.


Redneck    Posted 05-16-2003 at 02:36:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
You've heard of "grin'n like a mule eatn' briars"?


Sid    Posted 05-15-2003 at 19:09:30       [Reply]  [No Email]
I have seen cattle in such poor shape and poor pasture conditions wrap their tongue around blackberry briars and srtip and eat the berries. I have also seen them eat buck brush when nothing else is available. Cows will eat a variety of growth from tree leaves to many kinds of weeds. While a young beef might nibble on them I doubt he would thin them out very much but would probaly keep them from spreading. You mentioned berry bushes If they are multi flora rose I do not know if a goat would even touch that stuff.


Red Dave    Posted 05-15-2003 at 18:43:49       [Reply]  [No Email]
I know that cows don't eat multiflora roses, so I doubt they will eat briars. Cattle can be a little picky about what they eat.
I think the others are right, goats or sheep might.


ret    Posted 05-15-2003 at 18:51:19       [Reply]  [No Email]
I suppose sheep would get through a horse fence, , three board fence with boards about 10 inches apart,that means I would have to wire it at the bottom I suppose. the dogs only needed one shot and they learned to stay away from it, will a sheep get the idea too, or are they too stupid?
We got guineas coming in a few weeks, so going to learn something new in that area too
thanks
REt


DeadCarp - trainers for electric fence    Posted 05-16-2003 at 05:25:48       [Reply]  [No Email]
We used to string lotsa electric fence, and darn near everything, if it sees something hanging there, will sniff it. So we'd string a few tin cans and covers on the wires here & there, they'd see the sparkle, sniff and respect the fence from then on. :)


Clipper    Posted 05-15-2003 at 18:03:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
Cows: NO Sheep: Yup!!


Stretch    Posted 05-15-2003 at 17:50:02       [Reply]  [No Email]
Try sheep. Goats will certainly do it, but they ain't worth the agravation. Sheep won't climb the fences.


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