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Country Discussion Topics
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Yard Art in Action
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Fawteen    Posted 06-04-2003 at 15:43:49       [Reply]  [No Email]



This is Tooter Turtle. His "frame" is an old disk blade cut to shape, with lugs off a wornout set of Canadian tire chains for feet, and a bracket off a horse drawn spring-tooth harrow for his neck/head. His shell is sea glass applied like ceramic tile, with mastic and grout.



The plant stand is another disk blade with spring-tooth harrow teeth for legs. The plant is Calibrachoa, or "mini petunias"


screaminghollow    Posted 06-05-2003 at 14:06:48       [Reply]  [No Email]
Talk about yard art. Less than a mile from my office, there's a fellow has a 1/4 scale horse and buggy coming out of a similar scaled size covered bridge which crosses a small pond. In Hanover Pa behind a small corner house there is a ten foot high stone tower, complete with a concrete figure in the window at the top and flowing concrete hair coming down the side of the tower. Near where I live, a family has a full size bed in the front yard full of flowers. A few years back another local family had a miniature church in the front yard complete with light up stain glass windows. With the steeple it was probably 6 ft high and about 4 foot by five foot for the main church. A lot of folks in these parts have little five or six feet high lighthouses in the yard. Just outside Canadochly, a fellow has a plywood locomotive, coal car and caboose. Things must be 35 feet long. Over near Frysville, in a cemetery, there is a small brick replica of the nearby Church. The Steeple is about 12 feet high and the building is about 8ft x 8 ft. No door. It is all bricked shut. I heard it is a mausoleum for a former minister at the church. Another nearby family has an old rusting hulk of a red tractor, old steel wheeled job, surrounded by flowers and shrubs. (At least the number of inverted tire-tulip planters has decreased.)


Randy    Posted 06-04-2003 at 15:54:18       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Nephew and I were talking today that we should take a class in welding. I'm sure we can make something out of all these bent mower blades!


Fawteen    Posted 06-04-2003 at 17:03:33       [Reply]  [No Email]
I got me a raft of them too. Ain't bent one lately myself, but the feller what owns the local B&B don't seem to be able to get through a summer without trashing 3 or 4 blades and a spindle or two. I wind up fixin' it for him.

Ain't birthed an idea ta use 'em yet, but ya never know...


Randy    Posted 06-04-2003 at 17:24:05       [Reply]  [Send Email]
It'll give me something to think about tomorrow while I'm mowing. Must be something to make out of them. If not we'll have to stop bending them!


Clod    Posted 06-04-2003 at 16:39:35       [Reply]  [No Email]
The guy up there is very creative.I usually weld things together to make a tool or something besides art.I have made a good number of bar b que pits of heavy guage pipe of various designs from about 40 inch OD to 16.vertical and horizontal.Always when I get through I find I learn to improve on the next one. The big 40 inch vertical would hold a lot of wood.I had a lot of oak to cut,So I put it in the pit green. I learned that even green woood will be ok for bar b que if you burn it untill it is all about burned through .No wood unlit.Then when it dies down to coals ,It has no bad taste or whatever bad smoke.


DeadCarp    Posted 06-04-2003 at 22:28:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
I used to have one made outa an old tractor dually spacer & boy that 40-inch sounds about what i'd like - amazing how well they burn & much heat they throw off when the fire gets reflected off the circle :)


Clod    Posted 06-05-2003 at 11:41:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
It seems every young guy who goes to welding school (around here) Gets into makeing bar b que pits.Most often they use oil drums if they mass produce. But I watch the things rust to nothing in a short time.Down by the Gulf here.I noticed they looose a small layer of metal every season.So being thin they are gone in short time.The think 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch last for years.It also rust the same amount but it has more metal to loose so it causes nor problems for a long time. So if you buld your own ,Just go buy pipe.Also ,Do not do as I did once, and use any plated or galvanized metal anywhere on it includeing the grill..YUK! Oh yes.those propane weed burners .You see them? Like a 3/8 pipe stuck inside a 6 inch long car exhast pipe.The end there is threaded so a propane JET can screw in that end.Has a small adjustable regulator on the 5 gallon bottle and rubber hose.I had one so I made a copy of it but with short pipe.The Exahaust size I made a pipe in the bottom of my pits to slip the burner in .That is how I lit the wood up with ONE MATCH.You just turn the fire on until the wood is burning enough.Slip the exhaust pipe out ,The pipe into the pit had a lid to cut off air leak.It is not fun to start the wood fire with expensive fluid.Before that ,I used old cooking grease I saved fron the fry pan.


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