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Country Discussion Topics
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Ohhhh what a relief! The wells NOT dry.
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annie    Posted 06-08-2003 at 08:24:35       [Reply]  [Send Email]
My well was running out of water! We are new to this well thing and didn't know much about how they work inside. Had a "professional" come out after many unsuccessful attempts to reprime it. The "professional" said we need a new foot valve that's down inside the well. Hubby and I watched closely as the man did his work and took the well apart and replaced the valve. Whoohoo. Water again.....for 15 minutes! Just long enough for the guy to load up his gear and get down the road. No water again! Called "professional" and said "what else could it be?" he said "I guess your well is going dry and it will cost $2800 for a new one" Since we had watched him take the well apart we figured lets take the line up out of the well ourselves and take a look at it. There was a big hole in the metal fitting above the foot valve. Hubby is off to Lowe's to get a new one and fix it ourselves. Hey, I figure the $150 I paid the "professional" was just tuition for a course in "wells 101" for us. I am soooo relieved.


annie    Posted 06-09-2003 at 12:54:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hubby finally was able to get the line all the way in the well after 2 days of trying and it works! Persistance is the key! and lots of praying :):)


annie    Posted 06-09-2003 at 10:35:58       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Well, (no pun intended) I maybe up a creek w/o a paddle. We have an above ground jet pump. And the valve was corroded. We replaced the pressure valve above the footvalve. But aren't able to get the entire hose assembly back down the well hole. It keeps hitting something. Now, either the well bottom as partially collapsed or there is a small opening at the end with which you have to fish the line into and that's below water level.Two days of trying and still no luck getting the line back in. We have a different guy coming out today hopefully who is going to try to help my husband get the line back in. If it won't go and it's collapsed...well, we know that spells new well and our neighbor had one drilled and had to go down 400-500 feet through the clay layer....uggg, he paid $8,000.


annie    Posted 06-09-2003 at 10:25:52       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Well, (no pun intended) I maybe up a creek w/o a paddle. We have a above ground jet pump. We replaced the pressure valve above the footvalve. But aren't able to get the entire hose assembly back down the well hole. It keeps hitting something. Now, either the well bottom as partially collapsed or there is an small opening at the end with which you have to fish the line into and that's below water level. We have a different guy coming out today hopefully who is going to try to help my husband get the line back in. If it won't go and it's collapse...well, we know that spells new well and our neighbor had to go down 400 feet through the clay layer....uggg, he paid $8,000.


markct    Posted 06-08-2003 at 21:36:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
i dont know what type of well pump setup ya have, but some types use a small hole in the pipe to allow the water to drain back partway to prevent the well pump from freezing and cracking in the winter, so you may not have fixed the problem, ya may have created another


Ron/PA    Posted 06-08-2003 at 09:22:47       [Reply]  [No Email]
Annie, if you already paid the "professional" I hope you have time to stop payment on that check. If in fact there is a hole in your line right above the foot valve, and it isn't a relief port, then your "Professional" owe's you money. Not talking as a ticked off customer, but as a provider of services. If one of my customers called me for a furnace repair, and I can't fix it, they don't pay, for parts or labor. If I would ever fail and they find the problem and repair it, I'd pay their mileage to get the parts, their labor, and pay for the parts as well.
Later
Ron


Jimbob    Posted 06-08-2003 at 19:28:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
The well 'mechanic' did not get it 'kick-started'. Ask for a refund, perhaps less the parts if you feel generous.


Clod    Posted 06-08-2003 at 09:59:47       [Reply]  [No Email]
WELL..Old fashioned business ethics are still alive and well here in the USA if you look for it.HERE IS MY GRIPE.Omission.It is TAUGHT by the guys who do too much teaching here in this country.For example.You may have a computer problem.So you do not know whay or what.You try to fix it.The guy who furnished your IP knows.He keeps that info to himself.He will not tell you by e mail on on the phone.But after all the work you do.You find out the problem lay at his feet.He reveals it after all the problems are solved.YUK!


Ron/PA    Posted 06-08-2003 at 15:32:27       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hey Clod, I don't have that problem I don't teach. I will gladly answer any questions while I Work, or we'll have a coffee and kick it around, however don't ask me to show you how to service your own furnace, sooner than later, I'll forget to mention something I'm doing. Then they'll yell cause I didn't tell them something.
Many years ago I learned to splice aircraft cable, (the kind used on ski lifts) The man that taught me asked two things of me, Don't splice any cable that will carry people until I have done it full time for at least 10 years, and don't try to teach anyone else untill I've been splicing ski lifts for another 10 years.
I have never done either, and that was a verbal agreement and a hand shake.
It's just the way I do business, I rarely try to diagnose over the phone, or the internet, (I ain't that good) and I back up my work 200% it's how I keep working. Someday it will be my retirement work.
later
Ron


Clod    Posted 06-08-2003 at 16:09:36       [Reply]  [No Email]
I hope this ski lift tech has trained a few helpers around the country.Most skills today that was taught by masters is not a big thing today.A guy from a big Ivy league iniversity wrote a book.But he was talking the boook up on radio when he told what his professor told him at Yale.It was."Act like you know what you are doing untill you really do." I fel we arrte fortunate that those guys get into book writeing instead of an occupation where lives are subject to his knowledge and quality of workmanship.But today they train less for most jobs than previously. Yes I believe that you must examine a problem personally before tell the owner you can solve it by the story he gave you on the phone.Mainly because if he gives the critical information to you.He has the answer already inside the discription he proposed as the problem.Most often when I ask for help it is because I did not know the source but the outcome of the problem.


Clod    Posted 06-08-2003 at 08:54:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
Pros are often wrong technicaly and right monetarily. They used to advise folks that the screen was sanded up.So you take a 222 cal rimfire rifle,Take the pump off then shoot down the pipe and bust a hole in the screen.Well after some time in study of ballistics and ammo you do some thinking. The 22 call bulet is lead.Lead is toxic.Now there are several of those at the bottom of your well.WOW!! STUPID! OK.Then there would still be water at the botton no matter if sand has clogged the screen.The 22 rimfire will not penetrate three inches of that water.You mitght consider lowering a stick of TNT on a pair of wires with a battery to set the cap off.That might unclog it.But the ATF might not want you messing with such items as these.So,, Why not just tear into the thing and fix it yourself?You can be your own critic on the project.Or you can call the neighbors over to play that role.If you live near a sidewalk ,You may attract sidewalk advisors.That is where I came in.Move away from the sidewalk next time.


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