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Country Discussion Topics
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Horse Sores/Warts
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Kathryn    Posted 06-20-2003 at 14:00:31       [Reply]  [Send Email]
My horse had 2 sore spots that developed underneath his halter. After I removed the halter and treated them with bededine, they turned into what looks like warts - hard crusty growths. I then noticed that he has some small spots on his chest. Right now they are small scabby, bumps. If these are warts, I'd like to just treat them and avoid the vet. I did notice that one of my other horses has started to develop a couple of bumpy spots. Can anyone help with this?


Archangel    Posted 03-01-2007 at 13:28:14       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I have miniature horses and just adopted two new tiny stallions. They are perfect except the breeder that has had them for the last six months has had a problem with horse warts. I have one LARGE house with hooves and four miniatures and the newest ones have warts, I am concerned about two things, one how can I correct the problem with my new little ones and how can I keep my present horses from catching it. I have heard people tell me to pull them off and feed them to the horses but that sound cruel and kinda...EW. Others say that you should just continue taking good care of them and they warts will fall off on thier own. What would happen if Compound W is used on them?


Archangel    Posted 03-01-2007 at 13:26:24       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I have miniature horses and just adopted two new tiny stallions. They are perfect except the breeder that has had them for the last six months has had a problem with horse warts. I have one LARGE house with hooves and four miniatures and the newest ones have warts, I am concerned about two things, one how can I correct the problem with my new little ones and how can I keep my present horses from catching it. I have heard people tell me to pull them off and feed them to the horses but that sound cruel and kinda...EW. Others say that you should just continue taking good care of them and they warts will fall off on thier own. What would happen if Compound W is used on them?


Kathryn    Posted 06-26-2003 at 13:46:35       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks for your responses. The horse was wormed within the last month. He's scratching his chest wherever he can - causing the bumps to bleed in some places. The halter spots have healed now that I've removed the halter. I'm spraying him twice a day with anti-itch stuff and using blu-cote on the spots he's scratched open.


screaminghollow    Posted 06-21-2003 at 04:14:22       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hard to say. Hard crusty growths, sound like proud flesh. A salve made of Adolf's meat tenderizer sometimes will reduce proud flesh. Normally proud flesh occurs where there has been a wound through the skin. But that wouldn't explain the bumps on the chest.
In these parts, young horses get what are called "baby warts" Anywhere from a few months to a few years old they get lots of tiny warts all around the muzzle. It clears up after a few weeks and there is no treatment.
This time of year, our "thin skinned" thorobred mare gets lots of welts from fly bites. We try to keep her sprayed with fly spray. For some reason, she gets most of them around her chest and shoulders. (perhaps because her tail can't swish the flys away that far from the aft end.
There's a farm near here that has a battle with strangles every spring. Nasty disease. Glands under the jaws swell up like baseballs and break open. puss and ooze. spreads like fire to other horses and can live in the soil for years. It requires shots of antibiotics every day for a week or more. They bleach everything, quarantine the affected horses and make sure everyone changes clothes and gloves after treating the affected horses. They hadn't had a case in 10 years and then every spring for the past three years. It will kill very old or very young horses even with treatment. Strangles occurs back under the jaw, halter straps usually go under the chin a few inches forward of the glands involved with strangles. So if it is definitely sores at the halter strap from chafing, it probably isn't strangles.
No mattter what, we try to have a good relationship with our vet. Our vet will give some freebie diagnosis and advice over the phone. I realize the vet has to make enough to pay his bills and they got some whoppers for equipment and meds. We try to keep him as a friend. He even did some free work for us when we agreed to take in a "rescue."


Burrhead    Posted 06-21-2003 at 05:34:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
10-4 on the flies. Around here we have warble and bot flies that cause the chest bumps.

If the horse has warts there is a wart shot for cows that works fine on horses. If the bumps are from flies Ivermec has a shot for them too.

You are exactly right about the location of the bites. The hoss can't keep the flies swished of their chest.


Lazy Al    Posted 06-20-2003 at 17:48:14       [Reply]  [No Email]
How long has it been since you dewormed them ?
Al


cowgirlj    Posted 06-20-2003 at 15:33:46       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Kathryn, have a gander at this:
http://equineestates.com/library/veterinarian/vs0a0.htm


toolman    Posted 06-20-2003 at 15:59:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
cowgirlj , thanks now ya gave me something more to worry about lol. no really i had been worried about that as well actually all kids of things go through your mind , but when the vet was here last month giving the west nile vacc. thats when i had babe checked, i still worry about weather or not she was correct, she is a really good vet so all i can do is hope she,s right and in the meantime i watch these small bumps and so far some have gone some are still there, i guess all a person can do is watch them see if theres any change , get the best medical care available and hope they know what there doin oh and one more thing WORRY lol


toolman    Posted 06-20-2003 at 14:25:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
the spots on his jaw are probably from the halter something like a callous, they usually go away after awhile if you don,t wear the halter on him all the time, thats what happened on mine anyways , now i only use the halter on him when i want him . as for the bumps on his chest etc. my vet told me they are caused by a change in food , i was unsure and figgered and some kind off bacterial thing in a hair folicule or something but she was right in this case as i had changed their feed, i wouldn,t worry unless they got large or something,hope to of been some help.


Clod    Posted 06-20-2003 at 16:27:12       [Reply]  [No Email]
Toolman you are a fine horsedoctor. I was off on an iron horse awhile today.He eats a lot of diesel.


toolman    Posted 06-20-2003 at 17:56:41       [Reply]  [No Email]
i got one of them too clod but it drinks gallons of gasoline, gonna put it out ta pasture, i think.


Clod    Posted 06-20-2003 at 18:05:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
Have you considered jamming hay into the carb and see if it will crank?It runs on horsepower .How you been pal..I see Ron PA skipped out for the weekend.


toolman    Posted 06-20-2003 at 19:31:18       [Reply]  [No Email]
doin fine clod , seen ron pa was over there just a bit ago , i,ll try that hay first i better pay up the insurance, just ta be on the safe side.


Clod    Posted 06-20-2003 at 19:58:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
I was off on a wild cyber safari Toolman..I forgot to look here when I got back See you monyana pal.


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