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Country Discussion Topics
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How to square building foundations??
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Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:19:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
20 FT long by 15 FT wide? Diagonal distance to corners? EASY WAY?


Hal/WA    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:35:26       [Reply]  [No Email]
If the diagonal measurements are equal, it is square, or at least square enough. If your opposite sides of a 4 sided space are of equal length and the diagonal measurements are not equal, you have a parallelogram rather than a rectangle. But as long as it is pretty close, it should work OK. However it has been my experience that it is a lot easier to get things squared up before the concrete has been poured rather than after it has set. Good luck!


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:48:20       [Reply]  [No Email]
Hal that works,, Proffesionals do that often.But the math and an engineers tape is easy to do also.


bill b va    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:07:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
my uncle used to say the easist way to square a circle is to drive a 4x4 in a bulls butt . he was a good carpenter


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:51:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
Ha ha~~ It took me awhile to figure out what your grandpaw was saying..The old times did wonders without the tools we have today.They found things that worked by long experience or determination.


walt    Posted 07-03-2003 at 16:31:55       [Reply]  [No Email]
The easiest way "mentally" to figure out which way to move. Imagine you're holding a cardboard shoebox at the sides with no bottom . As you push and pull on the sides, you will move it out of square. Now you can see which side is too long diagonally. The exact formula is A(squared)+ B(squared)= C(squared).
Where A and B are the sides, C is the diagonal.
Your example: 400'+ 225'=625', 25' is your diagonal measurement.


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:20:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
I didnt see you here Walt..I have not figured that one out (lately) But it seems you have the correct formula.Strange that it comes out exactly 25 ft.I will calculate it too,,But I will allow you a secret if you promise not to tell anyone else here.OK? I do this often, Various sizes of concrete forms.So with all else going on in a short time,I think much slower that my big boss.So I bought this little calculator.A project calculator for maybe 27 bucks.even if I was foolish enough to use the old American fraction tape I could wobble my way through the numbers.But why do not engineers use the system? The engineers tapes cost little more and you can spare brainpower for the job at hand.Example >>20ft 3 inch 5/8? x 15 ft 7 inch 7/16th? No wonder the French invented simple metric measurements!But engineers gave up before that and split the foot to decimals. They are bright guys so I think they have a neat measurement system. BRB,,Get my liddle biddy calculator Walt,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:29:14       [Reply]  [No Email]
WALT!! You won a turkey too! exactly 25 ft..Very strange,, What if Iwould have had 15ft5inch3/4 X 20ft 4inch5/8? It gets too hard for my memory to keep all that conversion in mind. OK my little calculator says >> 15 feet conv x + 20 feet conv x = conv divide (sign) answer 25 ft. So in all this problem I have not had to think but on the steps of the calculators system. The right answer is always correct no matter how you get there.


bill b va    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:19:08       [Reply]  [No Email]

you are almost right . the formula is square root of A square + b square = c the diagional.


walt    Posted 07-04-2003 at 16:43:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
A sq.+ B sq.=C sq. is the same as
Square Root of A sq. + B sq.= C

It's the Pythagorean Theorem.


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 17:32:33       [Reply]  [No Email]
Bill..25 is the exact answer..I used to memorise that formula you suggest but forget it as soon as I got to working on my project.You farmers are not just dumb country hicks I notice..You are intelligent country hicks.You have to be if you live on a farm!


buck    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:43:29       [Reply]  [No Email]

3-4-5 25feet


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:52:18       [Reply]  [No Email]
Ok,,where did you get 25 feet? Buck?


Charles(Mo)    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:42:18       [Reply]  [No Email]
Just remember 6-8-10. Six foot long, eight foot wide, ten foot diagonal. That is how I do it. But I know that there is a simple formula that will give you the exact for the dimensions you have.

3-4-5, 12-16-20 works to

Charles


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:57:47       [Reply]  [No Email]
Charles>> 3-4-5, 12-16-20 works to

Yes..You and Buck are right. But there is an easy way to do this as you measure across. In the first place I use an engineers tape because I am not a math wiz. I like simple numbers not conversions.


kevin    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:30:42       [Reply]  [No Email]
measure corner to corner. .


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 13:33:59       [Reply]  [No Email]
I did..Uneven,,Now what?


Annie in KY    Posted 07-03-2003 at 14:20:32       [Reply]  [Send Email]
now just make sure the other corner to corner matches the first corner to corner...if it's still not square than your sides are not the same length.


Clod    Posted 07-03-2003 at 14:32:01       [Reply]  [No Email]
You are right Kentucky..But while you are setting up concrete forms you can dance several little jigs before the thing is equal.


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