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Country Discussion Topics
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When does a piglet become a pig?
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Barnes    Posted 07-14-2003 at 07:19:22       [Reply]  [Send Email]
HI, I'M LIVING ON A RESIDENTIAL STREET, MY NEIGHBORS ON ONE SIDE ARE CLOSE ENOUGH I CAN STAND IN MY BATHROOM, WHICH IS DEAD CENTER IN MY HOUSE, WITH THE DOOR OPEN, LOOK THROUGH MY LIVING ROOM, ACROSS MY LAWN AND MY NEIGHBORS LAWN INTO HIS KITCHEN AND WATCH HIS WIFE WASH THE DISHES. POINT IS WE ARE CLOSE ENOUGH TO SEE EACH OTHER, BUT HAVE TO YELL AND SCREAM TO TALK AND BE HEARD.

WE ARE ZONED ON OUR SIDE OF THE STREET FOR 3 PET PIGLETS, NOT FARMING, RAISING PIGS IS AGAINST THE ZONING BY OMISSION. SO... WHEN DOES A PIGLET BECOME A PIG? ANY BODY KNOW?

MY NEIGHBOR DOESN'T LIKE MY PIGS I RAISE EACH YEAR FOR OUR PIG ROAST.


Ivey    Posted 07-15-2003 at 13:21:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
Barnes~ The day after they are weaned, they become real pigs! If you hold one up to your ear you will hear a little "click" right at noon of the day, after that, it's a PIG. LOL LOL. ;)


Kathy    Posted 07-14-2003 at 21:09:51       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I found this on a pork producer site.

While an adult sow weighs approximately 200 kilograms (450 pounds), a newborn piglet weighs around 680 grams (1.5 pounds). To prevent the small piglets from being injured, or crushed beneath the sow when they feed, sows and piglets are kept in special facilities called farrowing pens. These pens also allow the farmer to carefully monitor the health of the sows and their piglets.

Piglets grow up quickly, doubling their birth weight in about seven days. For the first two weeks of their lives, piglets rely completely on their mother's rich milk for food, nursing every hour during the first week. As they get older, they nurse less. At about two weeks of age, the piglets begin to eat solid food provided by the farmer. When they reach about four weeks of age, the piglets are weaned, meaning they are taken from their mothers and placed on a solid food diet. These young pigs are called weaners.

Weaners are kept together in large pens with other pigs that are the same size; this reduces the risk of injury.

Young pigs and sows are fed a balanced diet of ingredients such as barley, wheat, soya-meal, and field peas, with added vitamins and minerals to keep them healthy.

When a pig reaches five-and-a-half to six months of age, it is fully grown and now called a hog. Hogs that weigh about 110 kilograms (240 pounds) are ready for market. Hogs are usually sold to processors directly or through various marketing agencies.



Jimbob    Posted 07-14-2003 at 11:01:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
In my neck of the woods, a boy becomes a pig (man) when they are wanting the opposite sex. Don't believe me? Ask my wife. She calls me a 'pig' a lot.


Ron/PA    Posted 07-14-2003 at 08:52:39       [Reply]  [No Email]
Sounds to me like someone has a dumber local government than we do, I would guess that someone was a little too artsy, and cutsie, when they developed your zoning laws. If our municipality told me to enforce that law, I'd ask them if we had to kill their puppies after they quit being puppies?? I wouldn't do a thing different, after all they are pets, and they aren't yet full grown when you get rid of them.
Our pigs are all pets, up until they step on my foot too often, then all of a sudden I get the urge to have a pet pork chop, they ain't fun to walk, but the cleanup is wayyy easier.
Later
Ron


I always thought    Posted 07-14-2003 at 08:14:18       [Reply]  [No Email]
they had to have a "barn mitzvah." Sorry, I couldn't resist that.

Sounds like it is open to interpretation...in a situation like that, it is easier to get forgiveness than permission. Let *them* prove your piglets aren't.

tom a


Les    Posted 07-14-2003 at 17:46:49       [Reply]  [No Email]
Good one, Tom!
I still think that piglet is a character in Winnie the Pooh.


BARNES    Posted 07-14-2003 at 08:07:58       [Reply]  [Send Email]
DOESN'T SOUND LIKE I'LL BE HAVING ANY MORE PIG ROASTS. SINCE THEY ARE WEANED WHEN I GET THEM, IT SOUNDS LIKE THEY ARE ALREADY TO OLD FOR THE ZONING. BUT THEN IF A PIGLET IS NURSING, YOU NEED A SOW/PIG TO HAVE 3 PET PIGLETS???

THIS ZONING LAW SOUNDS LIKE IT COUNTER DICKS ITSELF. EITHER YOU CAN HAVE A PIG, IN ORDER TO NURSE THE PIGLETS, OR YOU CANT HAVE NUSING PIGLETS.


Cindi    Posted 07-14-2003 at 08:24:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
I would NOT ask. Just keep doing what you're doing until they come to you. If you go in there and say..'how old is a piglet?' you're going to get an answer from whoever is the resident top beaurocrat at the moment and it may work against you.

If they come after you, ask what the law states specifically. If it states specifically 'piglets' then refer them to the webster's dictionary, which just says 'young pig'.

In relation to what? It's like defining a color. A one year old pig is a young pig in relation to a dog which could live for twenty years or a human which could live a hundred years. See what I mean?



Les    Posted 07-14-2003 at 07:34:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
A "piglet" is a Hollywood invention. A pig is a pig is a pig. Unless it's a hog.


Cindi    Posted 07-14-2003 at 07:26:45       [Reply]  [No Email]
I don't know what the exact age is, but generally a piglet is still nursing. Then it becomes a weanling after it is seperated from the mother, then a gilt or boar or barrow, then a sow or boar or barrow. A barrow is a male pig that has been castrated.

The dictionary definition is just 'a young pig' so I guess it's pretty much open to interpretation. I guess your zoning commitee would have to provide the answer.


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