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Country Discussion Topics
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Any plans for building a brush hog, box blade, mid
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Paul Seagraves    Posted 09-12-2003 at 22:36:59       [Reply]  [Send Email]
if any one has plans or ideas for building a 4'brush hog, 4'box blade or a mid-mount 5'grader blade for working on my farm and maintaing the road I would really appreciate it if you would email any info to me PLEASE. I have a 24HP 4 wheel drive Mitsubishi that is a very good working machine, and would like to be able to do more with it.
Again, Thank You For Any Help.
paulseagraves@emaxxis.com


Chances R    Posted 09-14-2003 at 06:21:37       [Reply]  [No Email]

I built alot of different tools. The leveler that I made works great in gravel, or loose dirt. I use it to do driveways, tractor pull tracks, and parking lots. It is mainly constructed out of 10 inch channel iron. This items does not leave a pile of gravel or dirt on each side of the tool when being used.
Visit my web site photo album to see a few of the other implements that I have built.


Taylor Lambert    Posted 09-13-2003 at 18:43:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
Paul I build alot of my own implements, I built a few bush hogs for special usage out of different things. Usually I use a pre built gear box from a bush hog that has rusted out. I know some factory box blades wont fit a few tractors, I had a friend with an atlass and has a Little JD and we had the remount the lower links. I mid mount grader Is also a great drive way tool. Ive made a few after using the factory one that came on my Farmall Cub. Its really touch and go on some implements. Youll learn from your mistakes. Ive been building things since i was 14 and its been handy having a purpose built Implent that is unique to your tractor. I put in alot of feild lines and utilites that have to be back filled and mounded for settlement. I made a special blade that hsa 2 halves of 24 inch pipe so dad can straddle the ditch and it mounds the fill perfectly. Ive made a few rearmount loaders for older tractors that work real good to. Usually every thing i build gets refined a bit and suits one or 2 needs around the house of business.


Lazy Al    Posted 09-13-2003 at 05:30:04       [Reply]  [No Email]

Don't have any plans but made this a while back and it works great . Not like a single blade that is hard to control , just sit it down and it smooths out at road or what ever quite well . Bolted old grader blades to the front of each section that I got from the county garage they wear them out beyond their use all the time .
Crank up or down one side and you can crown a drive . Takes a few runs because it doesn't angle
you have to keep working it but it will do it .
Al


Clipper    Posted 09-13-2003 at 07:43:26       [Reply]  [No Email]
What do you use for additional weight on top of that slick rig there Al? Looks like you could inset solid cinder blocks on the top....


Lazy Al    Posted 09-13-2003 at 16:01:57       [Reply]  [No Email]
So far it hasn't needed any extra weight . If the
ground is dry and hard it doen't cut real good . but like after a rain on gravel or in soft dirt it will be more then that little 54 NAA can pull .
You can take a five yard load and raise it up and push over the top then drop it and pull some off and in no time you have it leveled out . then you can drag it where you want .
If I had hyd power I would just hook it to the three point and raise and lower it with a hyd
cylinder I think it would work better .
hard on this ole neck looking back at it and I would have up and down pressure .
But all and all it does a nice job just like it is
Al


NEAT! - Larry 8N75381    Posted 09-13-2003 at 07:25:08       [Reply]  [No Email]
Good job Al!

I saved the image to use when I get time to make one for myself. I like the way it lays flat across a large area. That would make leveling a lawn a cake walk. :-)

Is that a NAA pulling it? Have you shown your implement to the guys on the N-Board of YT? I think they would like to see it.

Regards,
Larry


Lazy Al    Posted 09-13-2003 at 16:15:53       [Reply]  [No Email]
If you make one be sure and make it wider then
the tractor tires that your going to pull it with . This one is 3 foot by six foot but if you was going with a bigger tractor you might want it 7 ft .
No I have never posted over on the N board I hardly have time to read this one but you can
post it over there if you like and if any one wants a material list and measurments I could give them to whom ever
We was using it to level out for a concrete pour and had hardly any hand work .
Al


I wouldn't...    Posted 09-13-2003 at 03:41:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
Fabricate a bush-hog on a dare...They are too darn dangerous to begin with...Find a good used one...

Box blade would be easy enough if you had all the 1/4 inch plate and bar stock just laying around...

Salmoneye, The Chicken


AMEN!!    Posted 09-13-2003 at 07:07:13       [Reply]  [No Email]
Salmoneye! And you did not state it strong enough.

This is a case where Paul is being "penny wise and pound foolish!" He would be "STUPID beyond belief" to make something as dangerous as bush hog! The energy that the rotating blades have is a LOT! They have come loose many times, even I have had one come off luckily in heavy brush so it did not go far. But they can do a LOT of damage and killif someone were to get hit. I heard, on one of the boards here at YT, that a lady was likked when a blade came off a right-of-way mower.

The liability lawyers would have a slam-dunk


oops hit post button    Posted 09-13-2003 at 07:16:39       [Reply]  [No Email]
Sorry! had not finished.

The liability lawyers would have a slam-dunk damage case against Paul if something bad were to happen. He could loose everything he has since he was solely responsible for the design, manufacture and operation of the bush hog. At lease with one from a manufacture you avoid the design and manufacturing defect issue.

Then there is the issue of the gear box. NOT a simple thing to design or build at home. Something I wouldn't try, and I am a Mechanical Engineer so I could do the design and maybe even make most of it. Just not time/cost effective when they are so readily available, and not that expensive, e=really!

My $0.02

Regards,
Larry 8N75381


Ron,Ar    Posted 09-13-2003 at 16:47:02       [Reply]  [No Email]
Many years ago, my father who was a fairly smart man,tried to build a bush hog of sorts. He wanted to cut weeds mostly. He took a auto rear end, welded lift arms on it, turned the pinion down, left the tires on it. He fabricated some blades, hooked it to an 8-N and took off thru the pasture. A DISMAL failure. Wrong gear ratio and other problems. He did however build a fine middle buster from scratch that is still used 30 years later.


hay    Posted 09-13-2003 at 03:30:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
probably your best bet would be to find good used implements. building your own will cost much more than buying them. go to auctions and watch classified ads. i tried building and major repairing and found out it is expensive and very labor consuming. just my $0.02 worth.


Clipper    Posted 09-12-2003 at 23:34:09       [Reply]  [No Email]
If there are any tractor dealerships near you mebbe you could get a close-up look at what you're looking to fabricate.You may try contacting the major manufacturers of these implements but I'm not sure they would be willing to hand over plans.


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