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Country Discussion Topics
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High Tensile fencing in Maine?
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Julie    Posted 09-22-2003 at 09:05:57       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi,
I just cleared 16 acres of land in Maine and
need to get some critters on it before it grows
back to woods again! The piece is
surrounded by trees/forest and also old
stumps and boulders from bulldozer clearing
the fields (a pretty good fence in itself)
Can I use some of the trees for fence posts
(with High Tensile wire) This would save me
money. And what gauge wire is good? Can
you rent the tools or should I invest?
Also....what type of livestock would work best
for keeping down brush? I hear goats are
great but difficult to keep in?



Jimbob    Posted 09-24-2003 at 06:30:59       [Reply]  [No Email]
I would drop in metal posts & install a 8-10 joule electric fence. A powerful fencer will charge wet weeds, although you have to cut the weeds a few times a year. Keep short hair animals away from the fence- especially horses & dogs. Electric fences are cheaper, uses less fence wire & does not harm to the existing trees.

You must post a sign warning of the fence every 294 feet or less. Make sure the top wire is visable so a dirt bike or snowmobile rider does not contact the fence resulting in an injury.


Willy-N    Posted 09-22-2003 at 11:37:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
If you want to use trees don't wrap or nail the fence wire to them. Spike a treated board on the side first that way as the tree grows it will not grow around the wire and you can remove the board at a later date and not realy harm the tree. DNR allows this way for there Only Approved Method of ancoring the wire to a tree.


Ron/PA    Posted 09-22-2003 at 09:20:39       [Reply]  [No Email]
Julie, most of these are questions that you should have asked before you started.
As for using trees for fence posts, Yes it can be done, providing that the trees are yours. Not shared trees in a property line, but truley yours. Is it a good idea? Not if you may ever want to do anything with the trees you will kill, including for firewood. You run a nail into that tree, or the wire gets ingrown, and sooner or later, a saw blade or chain will hit it, someone could get hurt, and it could be you, a grandkid, or a stranger. I'd rather cut down 20 trees to make 10 fence posts, than allow someone to put hardware in my trees.
As for the critters to brush off your property, I've seen goats do wonderous things with brush lots. I've never raised them, so I can't speak to the problems with keeping them contained, but living in Maine, I'd kinda think that they might become very expensive weed eaters, the winter season feed bill, could cost more than a good mower.
later
Ron


Lazy Al    Posted 09-22-2003 at 11:11:41       [Reply]  [No Email]
I agree DON'T USE TREES AS FENCE POST.
All around my wood lot and one lane down the middle has trees with wire right thru the middle and insulator in alot of them . I just shake my head every time I see one .When I get to needing more wood then I have already have in tops they will be the first to go . Cut them four foot up and then do some thing with the stump .
Al


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