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Country Discussion Topics
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Need advice on my pug puppy
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Rhonda    Posted 10-03-2003 at 10:56:08       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I have a Pug she is now 8 months old her name is Mai Ling, She has developed a small patch of hair loss on her temple but it isn't raw or she dosen't scratch it, could this be the mange? I was told if it was the mange it was in her bloodline.and i should not breed her, But the thing is i bought her to breed and to love of course, But if its that kind of mange what should i do, i cant breed her, should i request another puppy or money back? but if she wants her back i cant do that i have grown attached to her, i guess i just need to see the vet first before i jump to anything, but just wondering if anyone had any advice....thank you


dick russell    Posted 10-10-2003 at 06:48:23       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Red mange, which is caused by a mite usually starts as a
small spot on the head. The mites are just a symptom of
what is going on. The real problem is a suppressed
immune system. Fix that and the mange goes away. Years
back, Cornell vet school did a study. They got the same
cure rate with vit e and vit c that they got with dips. My vet
claims that unless it generalizes, you'll get the same cure
rate by doing nothing. Probably a good idea to get a
scraping as diagnosis, but there's not much reason to dunk
the pooch in toxic chemicals if it's red mange.

As to breeding, a localized case is not reason enough to
not breed her. If it generalizes, that's a reason. But then
there's the question of how many dogs this old world can
support. We're still killing about 7 million excess pups a
year. That's too many. Waaaay too many.


Paula    Posted 10-03-2003 at 12:40:44       [Reply]  [Send Email]
There are more reasons than mange (and there are
different types of mange) for hair loss. Ringworm also
causes patches of hair loss and looks mangy. Mind
you ring worm is quite contagious so you are right to
take this to your vet.

With regards to breeding your pug there are many more
issues to consider when looking at the quality of
breeding stock.

1. Is she conformationally correct? Is she a good
representative of the breed - has she been proved in
conformation competition or evaluated by an
experienced pug fancier?

2. Has she been OFA'd? Small dogs especially can
suffer from luxating patellae which is inherited. CERF
certification is good too since all breed suffer from
inherited eye problems like PRA (progressive retinal
atrophy).

3. Has her line had problems with genetic
predispositions of the breed? For instance, pugs can be
born with a spinal defect called a hemivertebra that
causes malformation of the spine and paralysis. She
may not have the disease but does she have the gene?

4. Do you have the money for her prenatal physical,
stud fees, vet checks while she's pregnant and vet fees
for delivery and post delivery? If the mom suffers
complications and is unable to nurse the pups will you?
If the pups are ill or deformed will you be able to
euthanize them? If the mom needs a c-section do you
have the money for it?

5. Do you have a reserve list of people waiting for
pups? Do you have an application and screening
system for people interested in your pups? If you can't
sell them what would you do with them? Do you have
room to raise these animals yourself?

Can't think of other considerations at the moment.
Remember, the HSUS (Humane Society) estimates that
we kill 5million dogs and cats in shelters in the US
every year. So bringing more pups and kittens into the
world is not a decision to be taken lightly.

JMO of course.
Paula


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