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Country Discussion Topics
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PRUDUCTS TO COVER SEPTIC TANK IN WINTER
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LARRY    Posted 10-10-2003 at 21:30:47       [Reply]  [Send Email]
ANYBODY KNOW IF THERE IS A PRODUCT OUT THERE THAT I BUY TO COVER MY SEPTIC TANK AND DRAIN FIELD DRAIN SO IT WON'T FREEZE IN THE WINTER UP HERE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA.


Hal/WA    Posted 10-11-2003 at 14:43:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
An easy way to do it would be to get some bales of hay or straw and stack them tightly together over the tank. Or maybe that would be the perfect place for a compost pile.

If a septic tank is working properly, it produces quite a bit of heat from the bacterial action going on inside it, digesting the solids. That is why the snow melts first over the septic tank and the grass stays green there.

Have you, or any of your neighbors had trouble with septic systems freezing up? If so, I would suspect that they should be buried deeper. But having your tank really deep sure makes it inconvenient when you have to dig it up for pumping.

If you, like some of my neighbors, have been forced to install a pressure mound instead of a conventional drainfield, I could see the possibility of effluent freezing in the main outlet pipe and the system stopping up. A relatively easy fix for this would be to put a waterproof heat tape around the pipe where it is vulnerable. I sure am not impressed with those pressure mounds.....lots of hassle and expense.

Hopefully you would never have a problem. Good luck.


deadcarp    Posted 10-11-2003 at 05:22:06       [Reply]  [No Email]
best thing you have is all those blasted leaves larry. you can just pile the leaf bags if you're afraid they'll blow away. i drag a sweeper behind the mower and dump a nice foot or so layer around the whole area. you can add a cheap 4-foot solar fence on the north side too - plus it'll keep your inulation dry - we use a few steel posts and mount the silver side of a reversible blue tarp toward the sun - i tack one on the house to melt the sidewalk :)


Willy-N    Posted 10-10-2003 at 22:06:39       [Reply]  [No Email]
A good layer of straw might help do the job. As far as the tank I have used 2 1/2 inch thick foam board over water pipes to help keep them from freezing when I hit a big rock and could not go 3 ft deep and they never frose up. A good layer of snow helps keep the frost from driving as deep in the ground too. Mark H.


toolman    Posted 10-10-2003 at 22:12:02       [Reply]  [No Email]
i live in canada and it can get 35 below here even seen it 40 below in years gone by and never heard of covering the drain field , we do get a fair amount os snow though , our tank doesn have too much on it as it melts i think the heat from it or the hot water i dunno but we have never covered any of it and its not very deep i just pumped the tank and dug down 10 in.for the lids had some metal boxes made to cover them now so i won,t have to dig and find them any more , might stick about 4 in. of styro foam insulation in the boxes .


Willy-N    Posted 10-10-2003 at 22:18:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
I have not had problems befor either? Allways thought the tank made some heat diejesting the good stuff in it. As far as the leach feild it is over gravel and as soon as the water goes in, it is gone! I watched them install it and it is all graded right as far as the pipe goes so no pooling of water in it. Mark H.


toolman    Posted 10-10-2003 at 22:49:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
your right shouldn,t be any water in the field pipes anyway and if you ever get up on the roof in the winter you can feel the warmth comming out of the vent pipes, i think the soup in the tank generates heat and all the hot water adds to it too and the piping feeding the tank if properly sloped shouldn,t have any waterlaying in them either.


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