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Country Discussion Topics
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Out door furnace.
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Taylor Lambert    Posted 11-12-2003 at 10:06:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
Im wanting to build an outdoor furnace for my shop. It 40by5o with 14 foot walls and about 22 feet from the floor to the ceilings peak. I made a dood heater about 6 feet long with dayton truck rims welded together but never installed it. I filled my shop up with equipment and where the heater was to be got a ski boat in its place.
I heat it now with a 150 000 btu kerosene/diesel jet heater it doest smoke or make much smell but its terribly loud. It takes about 15 minutes to make the shop very comfortable with it. the other reason i dont like it is some times if We have company and my room is used as a guest room I sleep out there or if I pull a late shift on a job. Id like to put the heater I built out side in and old 500 gallon fuel tank and seal it off but leave the heater door outside. Id use the tank for a heat box and I have several 110 squirrel cage blowers. Id duct it all into the shop. I would also use to diesel heater to warm the shop first and then use the wood to keep it warm. I also have a used 1000 gallon fuel tank to just incase I need to make a larger one. One thing about using an outside heat is their isnt any place to put on and warm shop dinners lol.


deadcarp    Posted 11-12-2003 at 11:25:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
one furnace conideration is always fuel - ait only carries heat half as well as liquid, so you'd need twice the wood with a hot air system. we changed over to a wet system from hot air and an insulated rockpile under the house. our neighbor is in the greenhouse business and uses a wet system and wouldn't change. his problem is keeping 3 huge plastic buidings about 90 degrees right thru a minnesota winter and it does take some doing but that's his chosen path.


first of all he feeds 2 big boilers every 2 hours day + nite. pumps the hot water into buried pipes and in the buildings themselves he just uses old car radiators with 20" house fans to circulate the air. and he uses little squirrel cage blowers to keep the double-plastic roof inflated.

now i wouldn't want his job but what might work is along those lines: faced with your situation, think i'd weld up a boiler for maybe $1000, build a metal shack so i could stay outa the wind, bury pipes, set up a truck radiator/fan and mix in enough old antifreeze to keep from having to marry the thing. the rest is stoking and carrying out the ashes. if it's for daytime use only, heck with a reservoir, there's already 100 gallons around the fire.

here's my $1000 boiler - sorta patterned after a $7000 charmaster system ------ let me know if you want details taylor - price is always right :)




screaminghollow    Posted 11-13-2003 at 07:28:17       [Reply]  [No Email]
years back, Mother Earth News or another such magazine had an article about Scandinavian folks having outdoor heating systems. What I remember is that they were sunk in the ground, and the fireboxes were surrounded with wet sand. Pipes through the hot wet sand carried hot water to the house for heating. I actually thought about trying to build a unit which would be under ground and, in this area, not subject to freezing. It appeared to me that one of the old fashioned "cold cellars" around here would fill the bill.


Taylor Lambert    Posted 11-12-2003 at 18:08:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
DC I may build a liquid system like you described, I just bid on 17,000 feet of 3/4 and 1 inch steel pipe and a bunch of fittings. THeirs a small boiler in the scrapyard that I can rob parts from to. I may just go with a heater in the shop, Im trying to get my boat out and an upstairs apartment in the shop. When I get all that settled I may be able to build a reall good hot water system. I may buy a boiler this weekend at a boiler shop auction.


Taylor Lambert    Posted 11-12-2003 at 18:06:15       [Reply]  [No Email]
DC I may build a liquid system like you described, I just bid on 17,000 feet of 3/4 and 1 inch steel pipe and a bunch of fittings. THeirs a small boiler in the scrapyard that I can rob parts from to. I may just go with a heater in the shop, Im trying to get my boat out and an upstairs apartment in the shop. When I get all that settled I may be able to build a reall good hot water system. I may buy a boiler this weekend at a boiler shop auction.


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