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Country Discussion Topics
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Ol' Seppy
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How do you know    Posted 11-19-2003 at 06:18:46       [Reply]  [Send Email]
If one was to pump a tank, how do you keep it from collapsing? The paperwork that came with my tank says to NEVER allow the tank to go empty while buried, it will void the warranty. I assume if it voids the warranty, they have a reason....Not saying that I am or am not going to pump it...:) (It's a poly tank)


fw    Posted 11-19-2003 at 13:09:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
my mom and dads tank was in the ground for 30 yrs
and was never pumped once, the top finally collapsed.


my car has 298,646 miles    Posted 11-20-2003 at 04:23:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
on it as of today, and I have only changed the oil perhaps a half-dozen times in all those miles. Does that mean nobody should change their oil anymore because of my experience?

I don't think so! I suspect I was just lucky to have the car last so long without any problems. Any engineer and most smart backyard mechanics will tell you that some periodic maintenance is needed to keep a system operating problem-free, and a septic system is no different.

Yep, you *can* get lucky and run one for 30 years without problems, but it is a bad bet!

Tom


TB    Posted 11-19-2003 at 07:00:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
It can be done preferably when the ground is dry and you fill it back up with water right away. Short periods shouldn't hert but you need to equalize the pressure as soon as possable or the tank could collapse or float. Yes I have seen some steel tanks that pop out of the ground when thay were pumped. and the ground was saturated.


deadcarp    Posted 11-19-2003 at 08:54:49       [Reply]  [No Email]
thanks for the memory tb. i don't know if you remember it, but before the roadsides were full of power poles, there were many forms of energy competing with electricity, one of which was carbide. it was a pretty straightforward setup really, you buried a big tank of water in the ground, then sloshed in a dab of powdered carbide, screwed the tank cover back on and when it mixed with the water, it would form a flammable gas and sorta pressurize itself at the same time, forcing the gas thru buried pipes to the burner in the house. oh it was gonna provide cheap heat and cooking and everything. well, dad decided to try carbide so he bought the tank and hauled it out behind the chicken coop. next day a buncha guys shoveled out a big hole, propped the thing into it and covered it up. well overnite the water seeped around it and the tank started climbing out of the ground and by morning, you could see that black thing standing leaning over the chicken coop. i remember we had new burners and everything, but that was enough, dad took everything back and gave up on carbide. :)


TB    Posted 11-19-2003 at 16:18:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
I was working on a job and they sent a helper to pump out the mechanical room from heavy rains, the concrete hadn't been poured yet and he decided to pump out a 5000 gal sump tank that was in the floor. Came back the next day and it was pinned against the ceiling. :o


Willy-N    Posted 11-19-2003 at 06:53:11       [Reply]  [No Email]
That is mainly for up lift of the tank in a high water table area since the tank is light it could lift up from the water tring to float the tank and may destort it. It will fill right back up as soon as you start washing, flushing the tolet ect with in a day or so. Mark H.


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