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Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Woodstoves
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Lazy Horse    Posted 10-08-2001 at 13:58:38       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Can anybody reccomend a good brand of woodstove. I would like one that is built heavy to last, and can tie into the duct work for my furnace to supplement the heating bill this winter. We've looked at the ones at TSC, Farm & Fleet, and Lowes. They make some pretty ones, but all seem to be built too light, and more for decoration than for real heating. TIA


Joe    Posted 01-14-2003 at 12:49:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Vermont Castings


Greg    Posted 10-10-2002 at 04:02:01       [Reply]  [Send Email]
If you want to burn wood and keep the mess outside I highly recomend a Taylor outside woodburning waterstove. You can heat any way you want ie. forced air,baseboard fintube, castiron radiaters, or even infloor. The Taylor is the first in waterstove tech. and I know at least 50 owners in my area including myself with stoves over 20 years old. Feel free to ask me about these.
Greg


John Anderson    Posted 02-07-2002 at 10:59:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Please look at energyking.com We make hvy. duty long lasting wood & coal burning furnaces and boilers. 1-877-720-1794 puts you into the factory. Ask for me


Dale (MI)    Posted 10-09-2001 at 12:25:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
The last two stoves that I bought were made by Lopi. I have been happy with them both.


Jim (Mi)    Posted 10-09-2001 at 06:03:03       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I was on the Northern tool web site and seen they have a corn burning stove. They claim it is ver economical. Looked interesting.


Nathan(GA)    Posted 10-08-2001 at 19:57:45       [Reply]  [No Email]
My mother had a Silent Flame woodstove. It could be used as stand alone or insert, which she used it for. It did a good job. That was a heavy son of a gun. The walls were about 1/4" as well as the firebox. She decided she wanted the open fireplace some years later and sold it to a friend of mine. It's over 16 years old now and the guy says it's still doing fine.


Harry Blanek    Posted 05-03-2004 at 19:15:33       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Nathan,

I too have a Silent Flame wood burning fireplace insert and need some parts for it.

Would you be so kind as to send me a note as to where I might be able to buy gasgets and catalytic parts.

Thank You, Harry Blanek, Dallas, Texas


Cheryl    Posted 10-08-2001 at 20:45:10       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Somebody help I purchased a Majestic wood/coal cookstove and according to all the internet sites they never exsisted. I found one model and it was a Majestic Model 645 on this site. I cant find any information and not really sure what model I even have, but it is like nothing I have ever seen before. Can anyone help me???


Homestead Vintage Stove Company    Posted 10-10-2002 at 21:52:21       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We are familiar with Majestic wood ranges, and can supply parts and information for some models. We can be reached at the e-mail above or by phone at 360 / 677-2840. Our website is www.homesteadstoves.com


Ronda Crook    Posted 02-01-2009 at 14:00:30       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I have a Majestic wood burning kitchen stove. It was manufactured in St. Louis the only number I can find is BE-18-2 I have been using it and I really like it the porclein is cream and pink its missing a oven hinge if you can help me find one or any information on this stove I would appreciate it. I've looked everywhere and can't even find one that looks like it it has double warming ovens thank you for your time Hopeful Ronda


Les...fortunate    Posted 10-08-2001 at 18:51:07       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Vermont Castings makes stoves that are both beautiful and very functional. My brother has one that he heats his whole house with very easily and this is the mountains of northern NH. My son and I have a big outside furnace made by Central Boiler of Minn. that heats both of our houses. There are other makes, too. It's quite a project to put one in and they're not cheap but I never have to worry about fires, ashes, dirt, bugs, smoke, soot and everything else that goes with having a fire inside the house. And it cuts down the handling of the wood by more than half. Something to think about for the future maybe. AND, of course, the Arabs aren't getting any of your money. That may be the best part.


Kathy Jackson    Posted 03-11-2004 at 12:37:35       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I would like to know the value of our cookstove for insurance reasons. It is called The Great Majestic and it's a cookstove dated April 4, 1872.


Lazy Horse    Posted 10-08-2001 at 19:16:25       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks Les: I thought about the outside woodburner, but aren't they all hooked up to steam type heating. I'd like to have one but my budget is really tight, that why I want to burn wood and be less dependant on propane.


Les    Posted 10-08-2001 at 19:33:10       [Reply]  [No Email]
Mine uses a Taco circulator to circulate water from the boiler jacket to the house (underground) and to a heat exchanger which is basically a big radiator with a blower. Could be piped into existing duct work if I had any.
My son's goes through a super storer water heater in his cellar, then to his FHW baseboard heat. He has two zones plus the hot water storer.
Water temp stays at about 180.


F14    Posted 10-08-2001 at 18:21:47       [Reply]  [No Email]
I expect you already know this, and if so, forgive me, but just in case:

DO NOT tie the wood stove flue into the same flue as your oil or gas (or whatever) furnace. Code and common sense requires a separate dedicated flue for any solid fuel (ie, wood) heating appliance.

Using a common flue gives you two potentially deadly problems: CO (carbon monoxide) from the furnace getting into the house via the draft on the woodstove when the furnace is running but the stove isn't and creosote running back into the furnace firebox and giving you a rip-snorter of a chimney fire.

Also, be sure the flue you run the woodstove (or wood furnace) into is in good shape, with no cracks or open joints. Even careful folks occasionally have a chimney fire, and if it escapes the flue, it can turn into a structure fire in a big hurry.


Lazy Horse    Posted 10-08-2001 at 19:19:56       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks for reminding me Paul. I currently have a problem with the flue for the propane furnace. So putting in a new approved stainless flue is a must. I'm sure like you I been to way too many flue fires, and the worst ones were the old unlined brick 2 story chimneys that had cracks in the mortar which let fire spread everywhere.


F14    Posted 10-08-2001 at 18:21:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
I expect you already know this, and if so, forgive me, but just in case:

DO NOT tie the wood stove flue into the same flue as your oil or gas (or whatever) furnace. Code and common sense requires a separate dedicated flue for any solid fuel (ie, wood) heating appliance.

Using a common flue gives you two potentially deadly problems: CO (carbon monoxide) from the furnace getting into the house via the draft on the woodstove when the furnace is running but the stove isn't and creosote running back into the furnace firebox and giving you a rip-snorter of a chimney fire.

Also, be sure the flue you run the woodstove (or wood furnace) into is in good shape, with no cracks or open joints. Even careful folks occasionally have a chimney fire, and if it escapes the flue, it can turn into a structure fire in a big hurry.


Robin Hood    Posted 10-08-2001 at 16:45:12       [Reply]  [Send Email]
i am pretty sure that Harmon makes a wood furnace for the basement. i think they might be multi fuel as well,ie. wood & oil or wood & gas


Hogman    Posted 10-08-2001 at 19:15:32       [Reply]  [No Email]
Have a care about the multi fuels. We have a Clayton wood and gas.
The gas side only worked when it was brand new. Soot from the wood fire will quickly cover the flameout sensor and stop the gas side cold no pun intended.. Thereby, tha thang becomes a large waste of money and space.
However, the wood side is very good and of course the whole thang constitutes centeral air which is purty good stuff,


Burrhead    Posted 10-08-2001 at 16:28:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
I like the Ashley Mfg heater made in Florence, Ala. It has a blower and the outlet to plumb it into duct work or leave the outlet open and it blows warm air over a good sized area.

It's a cast iron fire box with a sheet metal cabinet. I like it and I don't know who else makes them like that except Buck Stove Works.

When you're looking at the stoves remember the catalytic stoves burn hotter and take less wood to run.


Lazy Horse    Posted 10-08-2001 at 16:36:40       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Thanks for the input Burr. All the ones I have found locally are geared for the yuppies to use for ornaments or entertaining ambience, which was not what I was looking for.


Burrhead    Posted 10-08-2001 at 17:29:28       [Reply]  [No Email]
Yeah I got sucked into buying a "purdy" knockoff once. All it was good for was to eat wood and make a mess.


Lazy Horse    Posted 10-08-2001 at 19:28:33       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I don't care whether it's pretty or not, as long as it works and lasts. The wife wants to go and buy one of the $149 specials at Lowes. I tried to explain that it will eat more wood than it's worth, and probably melt down in a couple of years.
We already have a vent free gas fireplace we bought to supplement heat when the electric went out, and we used it for a bout 3 weeks last winter when we had furnace problems. It works great since we have the northern insulation package on the house, and were only heating 1200 sq ft. But the little fireplace even running only one burner eats a lot of LPG which aint cheap. On the other hand we have an acre and a half of hardwood right behind the house with enough downed trees to probably heat with for 5 or 6 years.


Burrhead    Posted 10-09-2001 at 18:23:34       [Reply]  [No Email]
If the Lowe's there has the heaters like they have here you'd probly get more heat out of rubbing 2 boyscouts together.

All they have here is a Tiawan sheet metal and poor grade steel junk stove.


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