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Country Discussion Topics
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Who goes and gets real trees for Christmas?
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KellyGa    Posted 11-21-2003 at 20:18:50       [Reply]  [No Email]
We have made it a tradition to go cut a tree for Christmas every year at a Christmas tree farm. I used to pick pines, but they shed too bad, then I discovered the Leland Cypress several years ago. I just love them. They hold up a lot longer. I grew up with a fake tree, which was okay, but when I met Ian way back when, his mom got us into getting a real one every year. Shelby has never known a fake tree, and never will. She loves the trip sitting on the hay bails in the trailor, pulled by a tractor, going back into the trees, winding around to the back. She loves to pick out the perfect tree. Then we all head back to my house for some homemade chili and cornbread. MMMM...mmmm...I sure hope it cools off outside so the chili will be good and warm inside my tummy. :)



MikeTn    Posted 11-26-2003 at 12:41:52       [Reply]  [No Email]
Been using the same one for about 15 years. Go down to the basement, bring it upstairs, jerk the bag off and plug it up. Ready for Christmas. Christmas tree bags are a great invention.


KellyGa    Posted 11-23-2003 at 07:19:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
Thanks for all your responses. I enjoyed reading about everybody's Christmas tree times. Vic, sorry to hear your daughter will be away, who's funboy? Sounds like he needs a lesson or two whats important. You gonna teach him? :)


Swamphandy    Posted 11-22-2003 at 15:08:29       [Reply]  [No Email]
Ohm lergic 'n soez mah lil'un


Red Dave    Posted 11-22-2003 at 13:15:30       [Reply]  [No Email]
I got tired of the needles and mess, so I go down to the celler and pick out my Christmas tree. Genuine 100% natural plastic. Looks just as good as it did last year :)


natha n    Posted 09-30-2005 at 16:59:12       [Reply]  [Send Email]
YAY! I like jumpin' juminies!
Also its fun to be cool. Like me. Everyone sais I rock, except the people who are living. And some of the deead ones.


Bandit    Posted 11-22-2003 at 08:38:51       [Reply]  [No Email]
My dad won't allow artificial christmas trees in our house. I have to agree. There is nothing better than a live tree, that you go out in the cold and cut and the like. Wonderful experiences!!


Avagail    Posted 11-22-2003 at 10:13:18       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We have gone for the past 22 years and cut down a tree, such wonderful memories of when the kids were little! and such great pics! even tho the kids are grown, all but the baby who's 15! They still look forward to it. We go to Pea Ridge Farms in Hermann Mo. Wonderful family owned and ran place. When the 15 y/o was 3, he decided to jump thru the wrapping bin, the guys tied him up, and put a tag on him for 1.00!!! LOL! alot of folks thought that was asking too much for a rough and rowdy boy like my Jacob!!!


WallSal55 - IL    Posted 11-22-2003 at 06:52:40       [Reply]  [No Email]
I grew up on a tree farm (untrimmed, cut your own) and my husband grew up on a tree farm (trimmed, cut your own). How
about that one? My dad doesn't do that anymore.
The state claimed imminent domain on my FIL's
farm and tree farm, converting it to wetlands.
(Heartache, tears) Anyway, now my husband plants trees, daughters trim them, I and hubby
sell them cut near our barn. We are not in a position to do a cut-your-own-tree right now.
If it were possible, we would!


Ludwig    Posted 11-22-2003 at 06:44:35       [Reply]  [No Email]
Jumpin jiminy I'm to young to be this much of an ornery New Englander.
Cedar? Cypress? PINE?!? Well them ain't christmas trees. A FIR is a christmas tree, and you don't buy 'em you steal 'em. I though everybody knew that. I steal one from my neighbor and he steals one from me. We meet in the fencerow and have a nip off the flask to keep warm, you gotta steal christmas trees at night after all.
We NEVER put up a tree before the second week in December and then its down New Years day. Keeping 'em up longer is just sentimenatality and thats only for people who aren't working hard enough. ;p

Seriously though, Mrs. Ludwig and I live in a one bedroom apartment. First year we lived here I got a real tree, I think it cost $5. I figured a little place ought to have a little tree. Year after that we spent Christmas with my folks and New Years in Barbados, figured a tree was a waste, I was right too. Last 2 years we've had a little fake tree she got for $5, it looks good and I'll go to the park and get some real fir bits to make it smell right. Last year we found its twin by the dumpster, this year it'll go, fully decorated w/smell bits, to some friends of ours what don't have any money.
When we get a real house (2 year plan right now) we'll have a real tree.


Brian-2N    Posted 11-22-2003 at 05:43:12       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We go to a place only a couple of miles away. The elevation around here is quite high, so the gent grows nothing but firs. He is an arborist who does a tree farm as a sideline, and something to do when he retires.
We always loved Balsam because of the scent. Jeff clears parts of his mountain to grow more and more trees. Besides Balsams and Frasers, he grows crosses like Fralsams, blue Balsams, and trees from other parts of the country like Grand Firs, and Concolor and others from around the world from such areas as China, Turkey and Greece.
From the top of his mountain you can see quite a distance into Vermont and Mass. It's quite a view.
We ended up with a Grand Fir for a change this year. We tag it in November, and put it up the first Sunday of Advent, just after Thanksgiving.


Les    Posted 11-22-2003 at 05:27:38       [Reply]  [No Email]
Since the kids are growed up and gone, we don't have one in the house but I do have an outside one with lights on it.
I cut my own trees on my own land. I thought everybody did. Paying for a Christmas tree is folly to me. I have never bought one.
But, for all of you that do, I thank you all very much. Here in NH, especially up north around the Colebrook area, there are hundreds of acres planted to Christmas trees. That's how the former dairy farmers are trying to make a living these days.


Doc    Posted 11-22-2003 at 04:55:49       [Reply]  [No Email]
Daughters birthday is December 7th. It's a tradition that we go and get our "real" tree on her birthday. Makes it extra special.


Ron/PA    Posted 11-22-2003 at 04:49:25       [Reply]  [No Email]
We get real trees, guess we prolly will as long as we're gonna have a tree, since we both hate plastic.
For quite a few years we bought balled trees and planted them along side of our driveway, for a wind break and snow fence. Finally we got the line filled, took 15 and none too soon, diggin them holes in January just stinks.
Now that they are grown, it doesn't seem like such a good idea, seems every year, this pickup truck with Ontario plates cruises our road, and the minute we leave another tree gets topped out??
Later
Ron


Oh yah...    Posted 11-22-2003 at 03:20:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
Had a fake tree for a couple years as a kid in the 60's...

Have not had anything but real since...sometimes they are store or farm bought...If it all comes right and we can get a tractor into the woods we go and get one off my Moms land...

Salmoneye


bulldinkie    Posted 11-22-2003 at 03:03:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I use to and would rather have live but we have that new heat in the floor it cooks my trees


Randy    Posted 11-22-2003 at 02:12:58       [Reply]  [No Email]
I try not to get one at all. The little lady brought home a small table top plastic one to make herself feel good last year. I'm not big on holidays.


Vic in Kenefick    Posted 11-22-2003 at 02:03:36       [Reply]  [No Email]
I dont care for plastic trees either and I agree with Donna. I like it when them kids are having fun and not hurting nothing. When my kids were kids and I was really broke we would go out into the woods and cut down a pine tree and take extra limbs off others around it. Then we would take it home and I would drill holes in the trunk and whittle the ends of the extra limbs down and add them to the tree. We made so pretty nice full trees. The kids loved them too. Now we just go to a tree farm about 14 miles away and saw one down for about $12. This year Daughter will be gone to the Navy and Funboy is only interested in what is under a tree and dont give a dang about what is on it or what it is made of.


Donna from Mo    Posted 11-22-2003 at 00:56:01       [Reply]  [No Email]
Several years I have threatened not to get a tree at all, but in the end, I always relent. I have never owned an artificial tree. I love the smell of real ones. I don't care for phoney trees, flowers, or people. When the time comes to stop getting a real tree, I won't have a Christmas tree at all. A pet peeve of mine is a tree that looks "perfect". I like a tree decorated by children, all lopsided with ornaments, more at the bottom (kids' eye level) than at the top.



Bob/Ont    Posted 11-21-2003 at 20:36:40       [Reply]  [Send Email]
We get a real tree but we are in the Great White North Eh, Red Green Country. Now here is a money saving tip. Some times you have neighbours that have a tree or several trees that get too high Eh. Well you want to help them out Eh, they are likely too old or out of shape to prune them Eh. Now do them and your wallet both a favour. Just go and snip a nice Christmas tree off the top of their over grown hedge. They may have enough trees in the hedge to last you for years.
Merry Christmas Bob


Ludwig    Posted 11-22-2003 at 06:35:54       [Reply]  [No Email]
Goodday eh.
Yeah I let the little spruces on the farm come up where they may and mow around 'em make great christmas trees eh?

Heh, we'll I'm not really from the great white north, but just on the edge. From my farm its only about 5 miles into Atlantic Canada where they still have a funny accent but rarely say "eh".


Bob/Ont    Posted 11-22-2003 at 17:57:29       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi Ludwig, the east coasters that come up here loose their accent a bit in time but when they get excited it sure comes back fast.
Later Eh.
Bob


Taylor Lambert    Posted 11-21-2003 at 21:40:31       [Reply]  [No Email]
used to every Christmas my older brother took us out in the woods to get a cedar, one year we had a monster one , the kind that was too perfect to be woods grown. Robby just grinned when we 'd ask him but a few years ago he came clean. This old man and woman had him to paint there older car while dirt moving was slow. He painted it and they said they would pay him in a few days. The folks told him later it was a shoddy job and that they werent paying. So he thought about it and one night after thanks giving he was cruising around in a company track and noticed they had 2 trees on one side of the drive and 3 on the other. Well he got the kaiserblade out and felled the tree. Mom doesnt like the Cedars anymore so we get a lowes tree. I despise plastic lol


Bob/Ont    Posted 11-22-2003 at 18:05:40       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Taylor, all the years when I was a kid mom would go around to the north side of the house and top one of the cedars for a Christmas tree. Then she would bring it in and use a big box of coal to hold it up. We never had lights on the tree either, dad didn't think they where safe. In his younger days, before Hydro they used to have clip on candle holders on the trees, Talk about safety first. Nice to remember the old days.
Later Bob


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