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Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Home made wine
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Sam    Posted 10-10-2001 at 06:03:39       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I just crushed a bunch of grapes - to ferment - do I let it ferment on it's own or add regular yeast like the type for baking.

I know you can buy special yeast at wine making stores, but I know the old timers did it without special yeast.

Thanks.


A. Moses    Posted 09-24-2002 at 18:45:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I'm looking for a good recipe for home-made muskedine wine, made from white muskedine


Jake    Posted 10-13-2001 at 13:03:15       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Baker yeast dies when the alcohol reaches about 12 proof, wine yeast last to 18 proof, any grape wine will be dry about 8 with out the addition of sugar. As fermentation slows more sugar can be added if the yeast is still alive. From an ol resident of an Italian neighborhood good luck.


Nathan(GA)    Posted 10-10-2001 at 19:47:19       [Reply]  [No Email]
Don't know about the grapes, but with corn you can do either. The yeast speeds it up, as does warm weather.


big fred    Posted 10-10-2001 at 11:53:04       [Reply]  [No Email]
You could use breadmaker's yeast, but every ingredient in wine adds to the flavor, and breadmaker's yeast is considered by most folks to give an inferior flavor, kind of "bread-doughy". It's best to use winemaker's yeast. And yes, grapes will often ferment on their own, due to naturally occuring yeasts, but I wouldn't rely on it.


Sam    Posted 10-11-2001 at 06:12:17       [Reply]  [Send Email]
THanks, I found a wine supply dealer here and got a pack of wine yeast for 75 cents.

You wouldn't happend to know about how much sugar to add for instance per gallon of juice, can I add some water to yield more, and how long do I let the grapes work before staining and putting into gallon jugs to further work?

Thanks for the info.


big fred    Posted 10-11-2001 at 08:44:00       [Reply]  [No Email]
I got out of wine and beer making years ago. I was thinking there was a couple fellows that are regulars here that do quite a bit of winemaking that would have the answers you need. Sorry I can't recall who they were. The fellow you got the yeast from should be able to advise you, otherwise it's time to search the web for a winemaking forum.


mikeh    Posted 09-06-2004 at 10:15:17       [Reply]  [Send Email]
my grandmother taught me how to make muskedine wine...... she put 1 quart muskedines to 1 galllon of water with 2 cups of sugar....... u can or don't have to add the yeast..... she didn't....... usually have to start checkin about 7-10 days and tastin to desired proofin....... good luck


Kathie    Posted 10-21-2001 at 10:12:58       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Since you found the wine yeast, you should
also be able to get a brie gauge from the wine
shop. It will tell you how much sugar is in your
juice and you can add until it reaches the right
amount to correctly ferment out as the alcohol
content is reached and the yeast dies.
Hope this is some help.

Kathie


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