Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Horse needs
[Return to Topics]

MrsHarrison    Posted 01-20-2004 at 05:24:20       [Reply]  [No Email]
In the past few months, I have gotten 2 horses. One is almost a year and a half old and the other will be 2 in March. I have been doing alot of reading since I have never owned a horse before. They both are doing good on grain and hay but,I am concerned about them getting all the vitamins and minerals they need. Will a salt block provide them what they need? I can't seem to find a simple answere to this. Any advise would help.


cowgirlj    Posted 01-20-2004 at 09:32:01       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Here is a very informative link. When you get to equisearch, click on the HORSE CARE link, then FEED AND NUTRITION.
There is lots of other information on this site you might find interesting too.
http://equisearch.com/


Mark in Mo    Posted 01-20-2004 at 09:24:25       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Sorry, I forgot to mention. One of my horses is a Wild Mustang that I adopted from the BLM. If you have one of those, you "SHOULD NOT" start feeding them with allot of mineral right away. In the Wild, they are not used to this. So gradualy increase their mineral until you get them used to it. Hope this helps.
Just my O

Mark Hill
Dearborn,MO


Mark in MO    Posted 01-20-2004 at 09:16:30       [Reply]  [Send Email]
If you feed a 12% or higher feed and keep out mineral/salt block, you should be in good shape.
In Winter make sure you feed a good quality hay. It's best if you find a good source for your hay
(no weeds, not moldy) and stick with that supplier. In the summer, if you have a good quality pasture, I still feed (Sweet Feed) to my horses and keep out mineral/salt block. Just keep a good eye on your horses and you can ususlly tell how they are doing. I prefer "not" to feed straight oats to my horses because it's so dry that it can cause the Strangles. So if you want to feed oats, mix it with your Sweet Feed.
Just my O

Mark Hill
Dearborn, MO


cowgirlj    Posted 01-20-2004 at 09:14:30       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I have always been told if you are feeding a good quality hay, (grass or grass alfalfa mix) and have a mineral block (the brown salt block) and ready access to fresh water, your horse(s) do not need anything else. I believe if you start adding suppliments, you are messing with nature. There are so many products available out there, that it gets confusing. Unless my Vet advises differently, I stick to simple. An unbalanced system can lead to all kinds of health problems, so be educated and use wisely.


RichZ    Posted 01-20-2004 at 06:45:57       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I give my horses a supplement called Vita-Plus. I get it at Agway. Most tack shops and Tractor Supply Company carry it, too.

I give my horses mineral blocks, which they love, but they do not contain vitamins. Also, if you live in an area that is low in selinium, you have to make sure they get that, too.


Lazy Al    Posted 01-20-2004 at 06:03:07       [Reply]  [No Email]
I feed my horses vitamins A D & E
selenium (Sp) minerals by-carb bran and salt .. Mixed with oats and alittle molassas and corn . I mix all the vitamins and stuff
up first and add it to the oats as I need it .
Don't feed them to much .
Al


Get....    Posted 01-20-2004 at 05:27:21       [Reply]  [No Email]
Them a mineral block (red in color) and they will be fine.


buck    Posted 01-20-2004 at 07:48:31       [Reply]  [No Email]

Yes this is correct the redish brown block.Large one about 5 or 6 dollars and will last for months. Place it in a box off the ground and near where they are regularly fed.


Paula    Posted 01-20-2004 at 05:26:53       [Reply]  [Send Email]
They definitel need a salt block. Of course there are
salt blocks that are only salt, and mineral blocks that
are salt and various minerals. I've seen both in my
trainer's fields. Maybe young horses need other
nutrients too? What does your vet say? My trainers
horses also get a number of supplements: Lysine,
Linseed meal, B-1, clovite. What are you going to do
for training? You have such young horses.


MrsHarrison    Posted 01-20-2004 at 05:39:03       [Reply]  [No Email]
My vet seemed to think the horse block I was getting was fine but, my youngest horse would wipe it out in less than a week and it got real expensive, especially when I added another horse. (It had molasses in it) I plan to have someone help me train the oldest this spring. I am not sending him off though I figure I need to know how he will be handled as I am the one who will ride him and I probably need to be trained too. I rode alot when I was a teenager.


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community